Armenian Merchants of the Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Centuries: English East India Company Sources, Volume 88, Part 5

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American Philosophical Society, 1998 - Business & Economics - 294 pages
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As an organic whole, the present collection of documents-gathered together from a variety of original sources-tells a fascinating story about the trade relationship between the English East India Company & the powerful Armenian merchant community of New Julfa that lasted over one hundred years (17th & early 18th centuries). Multifarious & complex, this relationship revolved around the Company's continual efforts to break into the Armenian held silk & cloth markets. Perhaps more than any other single event, this trade relationship epitomizes the economic climate of the period, an age of competitive partnership. With the publication of this volume, Professor Baladouni & Mrs. Makepeace place for the first time at the disposal of historians a substantive body of documents that tell how this intricate Anglo-Armenian trade relationship started & evolved. Beyond that, these documents also reveal to the astute historian the human experiences that lie behind the participants' actions. The extensive topical indexes provided in the volume will be of great assistance to researchers. Finally, in the Introduction, Professor Baladouni addresses the question "What was the key to the Armenian merchants' success during the pre-modern period?" & submits a hypothesis for consideration. He proposes that their "fabulous success" may be attributed to the rare atmosphere of trust that prevailed among the Armenian merchant community which, in turn, led to two significant benefits: (1) organizational cost savings; & (2) organizational innovations. A glossary of terms & several indexes complete the study.
 

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Contents

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Copyright

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Page 87 - That the Armenian nation shall now, and at all times hereafter, have equal share and benefit of all indulgences this Company have, or shall at any time hereafter grant to any of their own adventurers, or other English merchants whatsoever.
Page 91 - Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies to whom Queen Elizabeth, after much hesitation, granted a charter of incorporation on December 31st 1600.
Page 88 - And we hereby declare, that we will not continue any Governor in our service that shall in any kind disturb or discountenance them in the full enjoyment of all the privileges hereby granted to them ; neither shall they pay any other or greater duty in India than the Company's Factors, or any other Englishman born do or ought to do.
Page 92 - Armenians (copies whereof you will have inclosed), and by our Ships which depart in September we shall further explain them to you and the publick advantage we hope to acquire to this Kingdom and the Company by this Agreement. In the mean time, before goods rise too much and since you have Stock enough, we would have Buy an the caiiicoes you you proceed to buy all the usual can this cheap season- J . /. r< 11 • n uj.
Page 91 - ... commissions are named and appointed ; and that the same, together with the several commissions, be entered in the county-courts by the clerks thereof, and a return made to me thereof by the first convenient opportunity. Given under my hand and seal, at Boston, this tenth day of March, in the third year of the reign of our sovereign lord, James the Second, King of England, &c., annoque Domini 1686. E. ANDROS. By his excellency's command. ED. RANDOLPH, Secry.
Page 90 - This Indenture made the Tenth day of January Annoq Dom 1686 and in the second Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord James the second by the Grace of God of England Scotland France and Ireland King Defender of the...
Page 88 - Company's garrisons to any ports or places in India, the South Seas, China or the Manillas, in any of the Company's ships, or any permissive free ships allowed by the Company, and may have liberty to trade to China, the Manillas or any other ports or places within the limits of the Company's Charter upon equal terms, duties and freights with any free Englishman whatsoever.
Page xxxv - Francis Fukuyama, Trust: The Social Virtues and the Creation of Prosperity (New York: Free Press, 1995); Robert D.
Page 91 - Armenian nation shall become inhabitants in any of the garrisons, cities, or towns belonging to the Company in the East Indies, the said Armenians shall not only have and enjoy the free use and exercise of their religion, but there shall...
Page 91 - ... of timber, which afterwards the said Armenians may alter and build with stone or other solid materials to their own good liking. And the said Governor and Company will also allow fifty pounds per annum, during the space of seven years, for the maintenance of such priest or minister as they shall choose to officiate therein.