Bitter Glory: Poland and Its Fate, 1918-1939

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Hippocrene Books, 1998 - Poland - 511 pages
4 Reviews
Watt tells the story of the painful birth, tormented life, and cataclysmic death of the independent Poland of 1918-1939. He also gives the definitive account in English of the dominant figure in this story, the Polish freedom fighter and strongman Jozef Pilsudski, whose admirers included Poland's Jews and Adolf Hitler.

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Review: Bitter Glory: Poland and Its Fate, 1918-1939

User Review  - Marc Dauphin - Goodreads

An excellent introduction to the interwar (tragic) history of Poland. A drama slowly unfolding, caused by shortsightedness at its best, fueled by narrow-minded self-interest. I learned a lot about ... Read full review

Review: Bitter Glory: Poland and Its Fate, 1918-1939

User Review  - Ja - Goodreads

Had wanted to read it for so long and should have read it sooner. Most enjoyable. It answered the questions I had and taught me what I wanted to learn. Solid. Read full review

Contents

PREFACE
7
S War and Peace in Poland
44
3 No One Gave More Trouble Than the Poles
62
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Watt is a noted historian. He won the 1996 History Award of the J. Pilsudski Institute in New York.

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