History of Scottish Seals from the Eleventh to the Seventeenth Century: With Upwards of Two Hundred Illustrations Derived from the Finest and Most Interesting Examples Extant, Volume 1

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E. Mackay, 1905 - Seals (Numismatics)
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Page 50 - Carrick, by his first wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan, whose age was about fifty-three years at the time of his accession.
Page 33 - Baliol, he calls attention to the ' well-designed lion rampant, the principal charge, with,' he continues, 'the tail incurved or bent inwards towards the neck of the animal, — a detail which belongs rightly to the Scottish lion, and is found constantly recurrent from the day of the making of this seal until the present time, with exceptions arising from ignorance, carelessness, or indifference, on the part of those who have taken upon themselves the task of reproducing the arms.
Page 12 - Ingibjorg, daughter of Earl Finn Arnason, and widow of Thorfmn Sigurdson, earl of Orkney.
Page 72 - Francis and Mary, by the grace of God, of Scotland, England, and Ireland, King and Queen," at Paris, on the i6th January, 1558-9.
Page 57 - The scene of their execution was an eminence to the north of the Castle, called the Gowlinghill, or Heading-hill, as it was afterwards called from this sanguinary scene. The event itself was one which drew from those who witnessed it expressions of deep regret and compassion. Duke Murdach and his two sons were men of gigantic stature. Fraser, in the work already mentioned, discusses at length the probable reasons for these executions ; Sir Walter's crime being probably that de roborea or spoliation...
Page 95 - ... that the history of a nation is reflected on its seals and its coins. He sees in them, in their turns, the archaic period of simplicity and severity of manners, then the gradual awakening of the sense of beauty which he has found in so many wonderful examples of architecture throughout the kingdom ; ' the culminating era of so-called Gothic styles found a ready response in the seal to the challenge which the ecclesiastical or monastic edifice offered to it ; then came the rejection of the Gothic,...
Page 57 - Duke Murdach, his son, Sir Alexander, and the aged Earl of Lennox. " They shared the same fate, and with like haste ; and to add to the ghastly spectacle, on the same day five of those who had been with James Stewart...
Page 94 - ... complete. Beginning with the seal of Duncan II. and ending with the seals of Charles I., he pronounces the whole to belong to a school of art of a national character, though influenced, no doubt, at different times by the arts of England, France, and Italy. Scotland, he finds, is no exception to the rule that the history of a nation is reflected on its seals and its coins. He sees in them, in their turns, the archaic period of simplicity and severity of manners, then the gradual awakening of...
Page 60 - February, 1436-7, and met his death by the bursting of a cannon at the siege of Roxburgh, 3rd August, 1460, after a reign of nearly thirty years.
Page 55 - Murdach did not succeed to any of the Earldoms until he had attained the somewhat advanced age of fifty-eight, and then enjoyed them for only a few years before the headsman's axe parted him from them for ever.

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