The Manuscripts of the Duke of Athole, K. T., and of the Earl of Home, Volume 12, Part 8

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H. M. Stationery Office, 1891 - Aristocracy (Social class) - 233 pages
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Page 5 - He never spoke again : but when, half an hour later, Lord Dunfermline and some other friends came to the spot, they thought that they could still discern some faint remains of life. The body, wrapped in two plaids, was carried to the Castle of Blair...
Page 28 - I received yours of the 13th instant ; with the Paper you mentioned therein, enclosed, — which I caused to be read in the presence of so many Officers as could well be gotten together ; to which your Trumpet can witness. We return you this answer. By which I hope, in the...
Page 5 - He bade them follow him, and rode forward. But it seemed to be decreed that on that day the Lowland Scotch should in both armies appear to disadvantage. The horse hesitated. Dundee turned round, stood up in his stirrups, and, waving his hat, invited them to come on. As he lifted his arm, his cuirass rose, and exposed the lower part of his left side. A...
Page 56 - Indies, and had a comparatively uneventful career. But the English Parliament had now endowed it with the enthusiastic backing of the whole Scottish nation.46 Its support became a matter of national honour, and its history was destined to be tragic rather than commonplace.47 HIRAM BINGHAM. 46...
Page 29 - How you will be able, in the way you are in, to secure us or yourselves? — 'this it now' is (forasmuch as concerns ourselves) our duty to look after. If the state of your Quarrel be thus, upon which, as you say, you resolve to fight our Army, you will have opportunity to do that; else what means our abode here? And if our hope be not in the Lord, it will be ill with us. We commit both you and ourselves to Him who knows the heart and tries the reins'; with whom are all our ways; who is able to...
Page 28 - Scotland; wishing to them as to our own souls; it being no part of our business to hinder any of them from worshipping God in that way they are satisfied in their consciences by the Word of God they ought, though different from us, — but shall therein be ready to perform what obligation lies upon us by the Covenant.
Page 28 - Nations,' as is alleged, — together with a disowning of Malignants; although he * who is the head of them, in whom all their hope and comfort lies, be received; who, at this very instant, hath a Popish Army fighting for and under him in Ireland ; hath Prince Rupert, a man who hath had his hand...
Page 5 - But it seemed to be decreed that, on that day, the Lowland Scotch should in both armies appear to disadvantage. The horse hesitated. Dundee turned round, stood up in his stirrups, and, waving his hat, invited them to come on. As he lifted his arm, his cuirass rose, and exposed the lower part of his left side. A musket ball struck him; his horse sprang forward and plunged into a cloud of smoke and dust, which hid from both armies the fall of the victorious general. A person named Johnstone was near...
Page 48 - Ho was sore bruised, but nothing of him broke, he will certainly be well enouth within two or three dayes. But the poor Lady Dundee with her sone, and chamber maid, were kiled with the fall. It wes ane houre thereafter before the ladyes body could be gott out, but it could easily be knowne, by seeing her corps, that she had been killed with the fall of the jists. The house itself is nott fallen, only the people to whom the house belonged had bin all that day carreing up...