The Early History of Oxford, 727-1100: Preceded by a Sketch of the Mythical Origin of the City and University

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Oxford Historical Society at the Clarendon Press, 1885 - Oxford (England) - 420 pages
 

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Contents

Then the discrepancies as to when the Greeklade schools were transferred
31
On the authority of the earliest record of Oxford i e under A D 912 in
36
The charters granted by King Arthur and others to Cambridge
38
A summary of the evidence as to Camdens interpolation
45
He makes three different Colleges lo have been founded by Alfred
50
Further pleadings
57
The myths more or less apparent in all hooks relating to the history
63
The British trackways
69
The absence of historical data during the remainder of their occupation
74
THE SITE OF OXFORD DURING THE Saxon SETTLE
80
THE FOUNDATION OF S FRIDESWIDES NUNNERY
86
The recital of the story of the foundation prefixed to the charter of reſound
92
Algar king of Leicester pursues her
98
The story told in the Cartulary of S Frideswide and the restoration
102
The probabilities are perhaps in favour of Binsey being meant
104
The Mercian conquest stretcherl southward to the long range of the Berk
110
The various editions of the Chronicle A The Winchester Chronicle in c c c Cambridge No clxxii
123
The probablc origin of the county of Oxford
129
Ælfward King Eadwards son dies at Oxford A D 924
135
OXFORD DURING THE DANISH INVASION IN
141
lhe lands there given or confirmed to S Frides wides
143
The Danish invasion continued the Dancs gain possession of the Berkshire
149
Eadrics treachery shown throughout and its consequences
155
Gemot at Oxford under King Cnut A 1 1018 where Dancs and Angles were
161
A passage given in Lelands Collectanca from a Rochester Chronicle
167
The importance of Abingdon Abbey as contrasted with that of S Frideswide
168
Harold Hareſoot dies at Oxford 1039
175
The great Gemot at Oxford Oct 28 1063 when Tostig Harolds brother
181
One AngloSaxon Chronicle takes William direct from Sussex to Beorham
187
On the supposed siege of Oxford after Williains coronation
193
On the question of an unrecorded sicge
199
Robert DOilgi with Roger of Ivry found the Church of S George in
206
But eventually restorcs it
214
The Castle bridges
220
THE DESCRIPTION OF OXFORD IN 1086 AS GIVEN
221
Summary of the numbers of the houses held by tenants whose names are given 327
228
The Castle garrison
283
As to that of S Eadwards Church
290
The streets in Oxford
297
The visits of William I and William JI to the neighbourhood of Oxford
303
reciting the original foundation in 727
319
William of Malinesbury Gest Pont An account of S Frideswide
323
AngloSaxon Chronicle A D 777 Offa lakes Benesington
324
Simeon of Durham
325
Florence of Worccster
326
Henry of Huntingdon The massacre of S Brice
327
Florence of Worcester
328
AngloSaxon Chronicle A D 1015 The Gemot at Oxford and Sige ſerth and Morkere slain
329
61 Cartulary of S Frideswidc A vague account of the substitute
331
William of Poictiers William goes to London via Guarcngeſort
336
8o William of Jumièges
337
Florence of Worcester
338
Cartulary of Oseney Roger of Ivrys gifts to the same
339
Abingdon Abbey Chronicle Kobert DOilgi restorcs the churches of Oxford and builds IIythc Bridge
340
Evesham Chronicle The relics of S Egwin cxhibited at Oxford
341
Domesday Surrey Robert DOilgis lands at xford
344
Charter of King William 3+5 97 Charter of Bishop Remigius conferring S Ebbes Church to Ensham
345
Abingdon Abbey Chronicle Houses purchased in Oxford hy Abbot Faritius
346
William of Malmesbury The Story of S Mildred
347
The two theories as to the origin of the name i e aThe ford of the Oxen
348
Reference to places with the syllable Ouse
355
The Thame and the Thames
363
The Orsnafordcoin and the interpretation by Spelman Walker Sir Andrewe
368
The rudeness of the workmanship
374
Thc invariable introduction of the letter R into the name militates against
381
Ill A plan of Oxford chicſly to illustrate Chapter XI
387
Ælfreds sovereignty over Mercia p 127
391
The names of the moneyers at Oxford during the reigns of William
397
Nor is there any difficulty as to the origin of the name 12
408
390
411
INDEX of Authors and MSS referred to
413
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Page 153 - Edward hither with his messengers, and ordered them to greet all his people ; and said that he would be to them a loving lord, and amend all those things which they all abhorred...
Page 282 - ... and let the shire appoint him a fourth term. If that then fail, let him take leave either from hence or thence, that he may seize his own.
Page 181 - Morkar for their earl. And the king granted it, and sent Harold again to them at Northampton, on the eve of St. Simon's and St. Jude's mass [27th Oct.] ; and he made known the same to them, and delivered a pledge thereof unto them : and he there renewed Cnut's law.
Page 222 - After this the king had a great council, and very deep speech with his " witan " about this land, how it was peopled, or by what men ; then he sent his men over all England, into every shire, and caused to be ascertained how many hundred hides were in the shire, or what land the king himself had, and cattle within the land, or what dues he ought to have, in twelve months, from the shire.
Page 186 - And there came to meet him archbishop Ealdred, and Eadgar child, and earl Eadwine, and earl Morkere, and all the best men of London, and then from necessity submitted when the greatest harm had been done ; and it was very imprudent that it was not done earlier, as God would not better it for our sins...
Page 222 - So very narrowly he caused it to be " traced out, that there was not a single hide, nor one virgate of land, nor even, " it is shame to tell. though it seemed to him no shame to do, an ox, nor a cow, " nor a swine was left, that was not set down.
Page 149 - ... must pay tribute to the army. Then the king sent to the army, and directed it to be made known to them, that he would that there should be a truce between them, and that tribute should be paid, and food given them. And then all that they accepted : and then were they victualled from throughout the English nation.
Page 62 - Sanctorum, where the author of the article on St. Frideswide has filled whole columns with a recapitulation of the myths, to the little guidebook which is thrown away when done with. The Oxford University Calendar, too, in its account of University, still has ' The College of the Great Hall of the University is said to have been founded in the year 872 by Alfred the Great 1 ,
Page 5 - At length, in the twentieth year of his reign, he was surrounded by a large pack of very savage wolves, and being torn and devoured by them, ended his existence in a horrible manner. Nothing good is related of him except that he begot an honest son and heir by name Ebrancus, and built one noble city which he called from his own name Caer-Memre, but which afterwards, in course of time, was called Bellisitum, then Caerbossa, at length...

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