Report of the Trial of Prof. John W. Webster: Indicted for the Murder of Dr. George Parkman, Before the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, Holden at Boston, on Tuesday, March 19, 1850

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Phillips, Sampson, 1850 - Evidence, Circumstantial - 316 pages
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Page 220 - Plate sin with gold, And the strong lance of justice hurtless breaks: Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw does pierce it.
Page 5 - French, did then and there feloniously and willfully kill, contrary to the form of the statute in such case made and provided, and against the peace of the people of the state of New York and their dignity.
Page 300 - Vanzetti, have you anything to say why sentence of death should not be passed upon you?
Page 5 - And so the Jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the said John W. Webster him the said George Parkman, in manner and form aforesaid, then and there, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did kill and murder...
Page 139 - The evidence must be such as to exclude, to a moral certainty, every hypothesis but that of his guilt of the offense imputed to him ; or, in other words, the facts proved must all be consistent with and point to his guilt not only, but they must be inconsistent with his innocence.
Page 6 - Parkman, in the manner and by the means aforesaid, to them the said jurors unknown, then and there, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did kill and murder...
Page 6 - Lightfoot then and there instantly died, and so the jurors aforesaid, upon their oath aforesaid, do say, that the said David Beckett, the said John Lightfoot, in manner and form aforesaid, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did kill and murder, against the form of the statute in such case made and provided, and against the peace and dignity of the state of Ohio.
Page 5 - Jersey, then and there being, feloniously, wilfully and of his malice aforethought did make an assault, and that the said...
Page 276 - In every charge of murder, the fact of killing being first proved, all the circumstances of accident, necessity, or infirmity are to be satisfactorily proved by the prisoner, unless they arise out of the evidence produced against him; for the law presumeth the fact to have been founded in malice, until the contrary appeareth.
Page 128 - A. is killed, it was holden to be manslaughter, for it was a sudden affray, and they fought upon equal terms ; and in such combats, upon sudden quarrels, it mattereth not who gave the.

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