Dyadic Data Analysis

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Guilford Press, Jul 28, 2006 - Social Science - 458 pages
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Interpersonal phenomena such as attachment, conflict, person perception, helping, and influence have traditionally been studied by examining individuals in isolation, which falls short of capturing their truly interpersonal nature. This book offers state-of-the-art solutions to this age-old problem by presenting methodological and data-analytic approaches useful in investigating processes that take place among dyads: couples, coworkers, or parent-child, teacher-student, or doctor-patient pairs, to name just a few. Rich examples from psychology and across the behavioral and social sciences help build the researcher's ability to conceptualize relationship processes; model and test for actor effects, partner effects, and relationship effects; and model the statistical interdependence that can exist between partners. The companion website provides clarifications, elaborations, corrections, and data and files for each chapter.
 

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Contents

Contents
1
7
7
Data Organization
14
2 The Measurement of Nonindependence
25
Categorical Measures
40
What Not to Do
46
3 Analyzing Between and WithinDyads Independent Variables
53
Interval Outcome Measures and Interval Independent
70
Application of the SRM with Roles Using Confirmatory Factor
231
Illustration of the FourPerson Family Design
239
OnewithMany Designs
263
The Meaning of Nonindependence
271
Univariate Estimation with Distinguishable Partners
284
The Reciprocal OnewithMany Design
290
Definitions
296
12 Dyadic Indexes
317

4 Using Multilevel Modeling to Study Dyads
78
Multilevel Modeling with Maximum Likelihood
85
Summary and Conclusions
98
Tests of Correlational Structure
119
Indistinguishable Dyads
135
The ActorPartner Interdependence Model
144
Indistinguishable Dyad Members
152
Distinguishable Dyads
170
Power and Effect Size Computation
179
8
185
Social Relations Designs with Roles
223
Interval Outcomes
342
OverTime Standard APIM
356
CrossSpectral Analysis
372
Summary and Conclusions
378
Dichotomous Outcomes
381
223
401
Summary and Conclusions
404
References
427
Index
445
296
447
Copyright

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Page 440 - Moffitt, TE (2000) Two Personalities, One Relationship: Both Partners' Personality Traits Shape the Quality of Their Relationship', Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79: 251-9.
Page 433 - Gottman, JM, Swanson, C., & Swanson, K. (2002). A general systems theory of marriage: Nonlinear difference equation modeling of marital interaction. Personality & Social Psychology Review, 6(4), 326-340.
Page 435 - Kashy, DA, & Kenny, DA (1990). Analysis of family research designs: A model of interdependence. Communication Research, 17, 462-482.
Page 437 - John, OP, Kenny, DA, Bond, M. H., & Robins, RW (2004). Reconceptualizing individual differences in self-enhancement bias: An interpersonal approach. Psychological Review, 111, 94-110.
Page 433 - Wiley. Gonzalez, R., & Griffin, D., (1999). The correlational analysis of dyad-level data in the distinguishable case. Personal Relationships, 6, 449469. Gonzalez, R., & Griffin, D.
Page 433 - WH, & Roberts, KH (1984). Hypothesized interdependence, assumed independence. Academy of Management Review, 13, 133-147, Goldstein, H.

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About the author (2006)

David A. Kenny, PhD, is Board of Trustees Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Connecticut, and he has also taught at Harvard University and Arizona State University. He served as first quantitative associate editor of Psychological Bulletin. Dr. Kenny was awarded the Donald Campbell Award from the Society of Personality and Social Psychology. He is the author of five books and has written extensively in the areas of mediational analysis, interpersonal perception, and the analysis of social interaction data. ? Deborah A. Kashy, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University (MSU). She is currently senior associate editor of Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin and has also served as associate editor of Personal Relationships. In 2005 Dr. Kashy received the Alumni Outstanding Teaching Award from the College of Social Science at MSU. Her research interests include models of nonindependent data, interpersonal perception, close relationships, and effectiveness of educational technology. ? William L. Cook, PhD, is Associate Director of Psychiatry Research at Maine Medical Center and Spring Harbor Hospital, and Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. Originally trained as a family therapist, he has taken a lead in the dissemination of methods of dyadic data analysis to the study of normal and disturbed family systems. Dr. Cook?s contributions include the first application of the Social Relations Model to family data, the application of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to data from experimental trials of couple therapy, and the development of a method of standardized family assessment using the Social Relations Model.

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