Lopez's Expeditions to Cuba, 1850 and 1851, Volume 21

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J.P. Morton & Company, 1906 - Cuba - 172 pages
 

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Page 35 - THE muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last tattoo ; No more on life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On fame's eternal camping ground Their silent tents are spread, And glory guards, with solemn round, The bivouac of the dead.
Page 1 - In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea, With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me; As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free, While God is marching on.
Page 168 - THE WILDERNESS ROAD : A description of the routes of travel by which the pioneers and early settlers first came to Kentucky.
Page 124 - O'er Angostura's plain, And long the pitying sky has wept Above its mouldered slain. The raven's scream, or eagle's flight, Or shepherd's pensive lay, Alone awakes each sullen height That frowned o'er that dread fray. Sons of the Dark and Bloody Ground, Ye must not slumber there, Where stranger steps and tongues resound Along the heedless air. Your own proud land's heroic soil Shall be your fitter grave : She claims from war his richest spoil — The ashes of her brave.
Page 125 - Rest on, embalmed and sainted dead ! Dear as the blood ye gave ; No impious footstep here shall tread The herbage of your grave ; Nor shall your glory be forgot While Fame her record keeps, Or Honor points the hallowed spot Where Valor proudly sleeps.
Page 123 - Their shivered swords are red with rust, Their plumed heads are bowed, Their haughty banner trailed in dust Is now their martial shroud — And plenteous funeral tears have washed The red stains from each brow. And the proud forms by battle gashed Are free from anguish now.
Page 123 - No braying horn nor screaming fife At dawn shall call to arms. Their shivered swords are red with rust, Their plumed heads are bowed; Their haughty banner, trailed in dust, Is now their martial shroud. And plenteous funeral tears have washed The red stains from each brow, And the proud forms, by battle gashed, Are free from anguish now.
Page 168 - JOHN FILSON, the first historian of Kentucky: An account of his life and writings, principally from original sources. Prepared for The Filson Club and read at its second meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, June 26, 1884, by Reuben T. Durrett, A. M., LL.D. , President of the Club.
Page 123 - Their silent tents are spread, And Glory guards with solemn round The bivouac of the dead. No rumor of the foe's advance Now swells upon the wind; No troubled thought at midnight haunts Of loved ones left behind; No vision of the morrow's strife The warrior's dream alarms; No braying horn or screaming fife At dawn shall call to arms.
Page 26 - ... their occupation, rank, class, or condition, whose continuance therein your Excellency may deem injurious, or whose conduct, public or private, may alarm you, replacing them with persons faithful to his Majesty and deserving of all the confidence of your Excellency; but also to suspend the execution of any order whatsoever, or any general provision made concerning any branch of the administration as your Excellency may think most suitable to the Royal Service.

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