Old Southern Apples: A Comprehensive History and Description of Varieties for Collectors, Growers, and Fruit Enthusiasts

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Chelsea Green Publishing, 2010 - Gardening - 331 pages
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A book that became an instant classic when it first appeared in 1995, Old Southern Apples is an indispensable reference for fruit lovers everywhere, especially those who live in the southern United States. Out of print for several years, this newly revised and expanded edition now features descriptions of some 1,800 apple varieties that either originated in the South or were widely grown there before 1928.

Author Lee Calhoun is one of the foremost figures in apple conservation in America. This masterwork reflects his knowledge and personal experience over more than thirty years, as he searched for and grew hundreds of antique apples, including both legendary varieties (like Nickajack and Magnum Bonum) and lesser-known ones (like Buff and Cullasaga). Today, many of these apples are at risk of disappearing forever.

Illustrated with more than 120 rarely seen watercolors of antique apples from the National Agricultural Library, Old Southern Apples is a fascinating and beautiful reference and gift book. In addition to a discussion of over 2,000 antique apple varieties, both extant and extinct, Calhoun provides the history of apples in the South, and their cultivation and uses by southerners.

Following his military career, Lee Calhoun and his family settled in Chatham County in central North Carolina. For the past thirty years, he has searched for antique southern apples and has grown more than 450 varieties in his preservation orchard. For sixteen years Lee and his wife, Edith, operated a small nursery that was an important source for rare and regional apple varieties.
 

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About the author (2010)

Lee Calhoun lives in Chatham County, North Carolina, where he settled after a career in the military. Over the past three decades he has sought out many old-time Southern apples and has grown more than 550 varieties himself. For many years he operated, along with his wife, Edith, Calhoun Nursery, which was a key resource for rare and regional apple varieties.

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