Consciousness, Biology and Fundamental Physics

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Author House, Jan 31, 2012 - Science - 172 pages
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Why are we conscious? Why do we experience the taste of almonds or the colour red? What is the experience of choosing between beer and wine, and how do we do it? Why do we think that only organisms with brains can do this, although our brains are based on the same sort of physics as everything else in the universe? The conventional consciousness studies of the last twenty years, wedded to a nineteenth century view of physics and biology, has failed to produce anything of explanatory value. Roger Penrose's hypothesis that consciousness is linked to a fundamental level of the universe is here considered more promising, but may not have responded sufficiently to recent advances in quantum biology and neuroscience. 'Consciousness, Biology and Fundamental Physics' attempts an updating of the original inspiration.
 

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Contents

SECTION 1
1
SECTION 2
14
SECTION 3
40
SECTION 4
69
SECTION 5
96
SECTION 6
138
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About the author (2012)

Simon Raggett developed an interest in science in his teens, but this lay dormant for many years, while he first studied history at university, and subsequently worked as an investment analyst. In the 1990s his interests began to move back towards science, and in particular the reviving study of consciousness. In doing this, he soon became disillusioned with mainstream forms of consciousness studies, based on classical physics. By contrast, he drew inspiration from Roger Penrose's proposal that consciousness related to a fundamental aspect of the universe. However, in recent years he came to feel that the Penrose theory was itself in need of some updating, principally in response to advances in quantum biology and neuroscience. This resulted in 'Consciousness, Biology and Fundamental Physics'.

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