The Social Psychology of Stigma

Front Cover
Todd F. Heatherton
Guilford Press, 2003 - Psychology - 450 pages
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The volume demonstrates that stigma is a normal - albeit undesirable - consequence of people's limited cognitive resources, and of the social information and experiences to which they are exposed. Incorporated are the perspectives of both the perceiver and the target; the relevance of personal and collective identities; and the interplay of affective, cognitive, and behavioral processes. Particular attention is given to how stigmatized persons make meaning of their predicaments, such as by forming alternative, positive group identities.
 

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Contents

Stigma Introduction and Overview
1
THE PERCEIVER
29
Why People Stigmatize Toward a Biocultural Framework
31
Threat and the Social Construction of Stigma
62
Stigma and Stereotypes
88
Ideology and Lay Theories of Stigma The Justification of Stigmatization
126
THE STIGMATIZED
151
Social Stigma and the Self Meanings Situations and Selfesteem
153
Coping with Stigma and Prejudice
243
THE SOCIAL INTERFACE
273
Awkward Moments in Interactions between Nonstigmatized and Stigmatized Individuals
275
Stigma Threat and Social Interactions
307
Too Young Too Old Stigmatizing Adolescents and Elders
334
Stigma and SelfFulfilling Prophecies
374
The Social Consequences of Physical Disability
419
Index
441

The LookingGlass Self Revisited Behavior Choice and SelfPerception in the Social Token
184
The Hidden Costs of Hidden Stigma
220

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About the author (2003)

Todd F. Heatherton, PhD, is Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Dartmouth College.

Robert E. Kleck, PhD, is Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Dartmouth College.

Michelle R. Hebl, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Rice University.

Jay G. Hull, PhD, is Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Dartmouth College.

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