The Parliamentary History of England, from the Earliest Period to the Year 1803: From which Last-mentioned Epoch it is Continued Downwards in the Work Entitled, "The Parliamentary Debates".

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T.C. Hansard, 1813 - Great Britain
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Page 775 - O thou wicked servant, I forgave thee all that debt, because thou desiredst me: shouldest not thou also have had compassion on thy fellow-servant, even as I had pity on thee?
Page 251 - Holy Scripture containeth all things necessary to salvation ; so that whatsoever is not read therein, nor may be proved thereby, is not to be required of any man, that it should be believed as an article of the faith, or be thought requisite or necessary to salvation.
Page 1077 - An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by vesting the Copies of printed Books in the Authors or Purchasers of such Copies during the Times therein mentioned...
Page 893 - An Act for the establishing certain Regulations for the better Management of the Affairs of the East India Company, as well in India as in Europe...
Page 27 - That palter with us in a double sense ; That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope.
Page 209 - That the freedom of speech, and debates or proceedings in parliament, ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
Page 281 - I will not enter into the question how much truth is preferable to peace. Perhaps truth may be far better. But as we have scarcely ever the same certainty in the one that we have in the other, I would, unless the truth were evident indeed, hold fast to peace, which has in her company charity, the highest of the virtues.
Page 777 - ... all the dispensations of Providence to man. These are the wicked dissenters you ought to fear ; these are the people against whom you ought to aim the shaft of the law ; these are the men to whom, arrayed in all the terrors of government, I would say, you shall not degrade us into brutes...
Page 771 - The Christian religion itself arose without establishment, it arose even without toleration ; and whilst its own principles were not tolerated, it conquered all the powers of darkness, it conquered all the powers of the world.
Page 297 - House has met before that day, or will meet on the day of the issue), issue his warrant to the clerk of the Crown to make out a new writ for electing another member in the room of the member whose seat has so become vacant.

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