Amurath to Amurath

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 23, 2014 - History - 498 pages
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Traveller, archaeologist, mountaineer and diplomat, Gertrude Bell (1868-1926) poured her extraordinary talents into a series of adventures through Europe and the Middle East. Addressing her experiences in Persia and Syria respectively, Safar Nameh (1894) and The Desert and the Sown (1907) are both reissued in this series. The present work, first published in 1911 and among Bell's most acclaimed, describes her recent expedition to Mesopotamia. She recounts her outward journey to the Abbasid palace of Ukhaidir and her return via Baghdad and Asia Minor. Notably discussing changes in the region after the rise of the Young Turks, including their easing of restrictions throughout the declining Ottoman Empire, Bell also saw this book as 'the attempt to record the daily life, the speech of those who had inherited the empty ground where empires had risen and expired'. Replete with photographs, it vividly opens up Middle Eastern history and archaeology.
 

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Contents

CHAR PAGE
1
TELL AHMAR TO BUSEIRAII
35
BUSEIRAH TO
77
HIT TO KERBELA 115
140
BAGHDAD TO MosUL
198
THE Roms OF SAMARRA
231
zAKHo T0 DIYARBEKR
289
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About the author (2014)

Gertrude Bell (1868 1926) was an adventurer, scholar, linguist, and British intelligence officer. Bell's courageous travels in the Islamic world of the Middle East in the late nineteenth century offered some of the first Western understandings of the culture and people of the lands of modern-day Iraq and Iran. Her translations of the poems of Hafiz are still considered by many scholars to be the most faithful of any in the English language.

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