The Chemistry of Fireworks

Front Cover
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2000 - Technology & Engineering - 117 pages
"For centuries fireworks have been a source of delight and amazement in cultures around the world. But what produces their dazzling array of effects? This book takes you behind the scenes to explore the chemistry and physics behind the art of pyrotechnics. Topics covered include history and characteristics of gunpowder; principles behind each of the most popular firework types: rockets, shells, fountains, sparklers, bangers, roman candles and wheels; special effects, including sound effects, coloured smokes and electrical firing; firework safety for private use and displays; and firework legislation. The Chemistry of Fireworks is aimed at students with A level qualifications or equivalent. The style is concise and easy to understand, and the theory of fireworks is discussed in terms of well-known scientific concepts wherever possible. It will also be a useful source of reference for anyone studying pyrotechnics as applied to fireworks. Review Extracts ""a worthwhile addition to the pyrotechnist's library"" Fireworks ""a useful source of information which makes absorbing reading."" Angewandte Chemie, International Edition"
 

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Contents

Historical Introduction
1
Application of Black Powder to Fireworks
7
Further Uses of Black Powder
8
The Characteristics of Black Powder
10
Influence of Moisture on Burning Time
11
Thermal Ignition of Black Powder
13
Thermal Analysis of Black Powder
16
Analysis by TG
17
Volume of Evolved Gases
63
Airblast and Sound
64
Roman Candles
66
Emission of Radiation by Stars
68
Chemistry of the Green Star
70
Ionisation in Flames
71
Chemistry of the Red Star
72
Gerbs and Wheels
75

Analysis by DTA
18
Analysis by DSC
19
Stoichiometry
20
Heat of Reaction
21
Temperature of Reaction
25
Rockets
27
External ballistics
31
Rocket Design and Manufacture
32
Recent Developments
34
Mines and Shells
37
Internal Ballistics
39
External Ballistics
42
Mortar Tubes
44
Energy Transfer Efficiency
45
Mines
46
Fountains
48
Atomic Theory
49
Quantum Theory
50
The Colour of Sparks
52
The Brightness of Sparks
54
Sparklers
59
Tubed Sparklers
60
Bangers
62
Method of Construction
76
Wheels
77
Special Effects
80
Piper Match
81
Plastic Fuse
82
Lance
83
Setpieces
85
Devices
86
Flash and Noise Effects
87
The Whistle Effect
89
Smoke Puffs
90
Coloured Smokes
91
Firing Electrically
94
Fireworks Safety
97
Organised Displays
98
Fireworks Legislation
103
British Standard for Fireworks
104
UK List of Classified and Authorised Explosives
106
Recent Legislation
108
Bibliography
110
Subject Index
112
Copyright

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Page 110 - ... centimeter of bomb capacity) of 0.0027 0.0005 g. per cubic centimeter, and an oxygen pressure of 25 1 atm. As the sample cup used in calibrating must be different from the one used for heat-ofexplosion determinations, correct the determined water equivalent for this dif' Davis, Tennev L., The Chemistry of Powder and Explosives, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 1943.

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