Indian Nights' Entertainment: Or, Folk-tales from the Upper Indus. With Numerous Illustrations by Native Hands

Front Cover
E. Stock, 1892 - Folklore - 380 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 369 - Wratislaw of Mitrowitz ; what he saw in the Turkish Metropolis, Constantinople, experienced in his Captivity, and, after his happy return to his country, committed to writing, in the year of our Lord 1599. Literally translated from the original Bohemian by AH Wratislaw, MA, Head Master of the Grammar School, Bury St. Edmunds, and formerly Fellow and Tutor of Christ's College, Cambridge. Crown 8vo. 6s. 6d. [Ready. Church Stories. Edited by the Rev. JE Clarke. Crown 8vo. 2. 6rf. [Ready. Aunt Judy's...
Page 2 - The farmer answered never a word. The barber then shaved his head, but still he did not speak; then he shaved off half his beard and half his moustache, but even then the man refrained from uttering a syllable. Then the barber covered him all over with a hideous coating of lampblack, but the stolid farmer remained as dumb as a mute. "The man is bewitched!
Page 125 - Tying the former pills in her cloth, the girl looked at the other pills incredulously, and then, with a sudden thought, she gently rubbed them over the snake, saying with an innocent air, " O snake, explain this mystery to me again ! Is this the way I am to rub them ?" The moment an atom of the magic powder had touched the snake, he was set on fire, and in another instant he was merely a long wavy line of grey dust lying on the ground. Then with a glad face the little wife turned to her husband and...
Page 122 - ... palace, telling the king all the things he had seen in the black world, and then, all preparations having been made, he was married to the princess, with great pomp and rejoicings. Then the king with his daughter and son-in-law lived for a great many years very happily. ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER. IT happened once upon a time, many years ago, that a certain king went into his forest to hunt, when instead of the usual game he caught a wild man. This wild man the king had taken to his castle,...
Page 368 - Pool (JJ) Woman's influence in the east: as shown in the noble lives of past queens and princesses of India, with an introduction by L.
Page 11 - Look at Lall on his beautiful mare ! ' ' And I shall not be long in making a match with some fine girl with a pot of money ; and I '11 get married, and I shall have four or five nice little children. And when my children look up to me and cry, "Papa, papa!
Page 134 - ... then he proceeded to undress himself. His garments were not half laid aside, when out from the bush sprang a hare, and the weaver, snatching up part of his clothing while the rest hung about his legs in disorder, made desperate efforts to chase and overtake the hare, crying out, " Ah there goes the foal, wo, old boy, wo, wo!" But he ran in vain, for the hare easily escaped, and was soon out of sight. The poor weaver reconciled himself to his loss as best he could, " Kismet!" cried he : " And...
Page 10 - This fellow is going to give me three ha'pence, and what shall I do with it? I know. I'll go into the market, and buy a hen with it, and the hen will lay eggs, and I shall have a fine brood of chickens. And I'll sell them all for what they will fetch, and when I have sold them I'll buy a sheep. After a bit the sheep will have young ones, and when I have sold them I'll buy a cow. And when my cow has young ones I'll buy a milch buffalo;' and when my milch buffalo has young ones, I'll sell her and buy...
Page 133 - One hundred rupees a-piece," said the bania. The simple weaver took out his bag of money and counting out the price, bought one of the melons and carried it off. As he went along the road, he began to say to himself, " When I get home I will put this egg in a warm corner of my house, and...
Page 125 - But what about my good name?' The snake, who knew not that she was already wed, hearing her speech became exasperated with her. 'Women are preposterous beings,' cried he, and he crept back once more to his hole. This time he brought out two more pills, and when handing them to the disconsolate girl he said: 'Revenge will sweeten your lot. When any of your neighbours revile you on account of your sons, take one of these pills between finger and thumb, hold it over them, rubbing it gently so that some...

Bibliographic information