The Italian princes, 1464-1518

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Houghton, Mifflin & Company, 1887
 

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Sayfa 236 - with God's help,' undertook to answer these questions. Following the Aristotelian method he discusses divers opinions and exposes the weakness of each. He concludes that the question of the immortality of the soul is a ' neutral problem like that of the eternity of the world ; for no natural reasons can be brought forward which prove the soul to be immortal, still less which prove it to be mortal '. In practice it makes a good deal of difference which opinion is followed ; for if the soul is immortal...
Sayfa 50 - Si quando rerum fasce non premeretur omni se remissionis generi sine discrimine dedit.' 3 The indecencies and buffooneries were very great, as may be seen from a description given in Burchard, iii., 227. 4 Giustinian, i., 404. ALEXANDER VI. 57 geniality and good humour, were all put down to unnatural feelings or to sinister motives. In his private life it is sufficiently clear that he was at little pains to repress a strongly sensual nature. Yet he was by no means universally self-indulgent, but...
Sayfa 130 - Pope's vengeance :>r his own, he redoubled his blows till Alidosi fell to the ground, and was despatched by two of the duke's attendants. While all stood irresolute, the duke mounted his horse and rode off to Urbino.1 The murder was horrible enough ; but no one save the Pope regretted Alidosi's death. With uplifted hands the Cardinals gave thanks that he was gone, while Julius II. gave way to an unrestrained display of grief. He wept passionate tears, beating his breast and refusing all food ; he...
Sayfa 241 - France was glad to have a breathing space ; Charles congratulated himself that he was free from the tutelage of Maximilian and could leave Flanders in safety for the purpose of visiting his Spanish kingdoms, where his presence was sorely needed. On the other hand England saw herself outwitted in diplomacy, and was jealous of French aggrandisement ; while Leo X., who had contrived by a judicious policy of wavering neutrality to promote his own interests in Italy, found himself in a strait. No doubt...
Sayfa 27 - ... alliance which would enable him to dispense with the support of the French king ; and if this alliance could be gained by the sacrifice of his condottieri generals he would be free from another source of embarrassment. He had used the condottieri to terrify Florence, and Florence was the ally of France ; if he could draw Florence into a close alliance with himself by sacrificing his condottieri, he might be in a position to hold the balance between France and Spain. Accordingly Cesare demanded...
Sayfa 192 - at translating Plato and Plotinus, that by the appearance of this new theology poets may cease to count the mysteries of religion amongst their fables, and the crowds of Peripatetics who form almost the whole body of philosophers may be admonished that religion must not be reckoned as old wives' stories. The world is occupied by the Peripatetics, and is divided between their sects, the Alexandrians and the Averroists. The Alexandrians opine that our intelligence is mortal ; the Averroists that it...
Sayfa 239 - writers who themselves regard toleration as a virtue," and say that Pomponatius " was judged in the papal court with a judicial calmness and impartiality which the modern advocates of religious tolerance might well admire." When speaking of Gemistus, the last original thinker of the tolerant eastern church, he passes unheeded the most curious passage of the Laws : ov KOJ, ao(f>ta-T(av, r)v TK -jrapa ra?

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