Military reflections on Turkey. Extr. and tr. from the treatise on the art of war. By a military officer

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1828
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Page 103 - A Tour in France, Savoy, Northern Italy, Switzerland, Germany, and the Netherlands, in the Summer of 1825, including some Observations on the Scenery of the Neckar and Rhine, 2 vols. 8vo. 11. Is.
Page 104 - Niebuhr, in particular, has thrown new light upon our knowledge of Roman affairs, to a degree, of which those who are unacquainted with it, can scarcely form an adequate notion.
Page 40 - The superiority of the Turks in the use of the sabre is founded partly on the quality of the weapon itself, and partly on their what may be termed national dexterity in handling it. The Turkish sabre, which is wrought out of fine ironwire, in...
Page 41 - Spshis make an unexpected attack upon him, drew his sabre, and was going to command his men to do the same, when, at the first word draw, his head was severed from his body. The highly tempered Turkish sabres will fetch a price of from ten to a hundred ducats, even when they are not of fine metal.
Page 104 - Translation now before us, which is executed in a vigorous style, and with a degree of fidelity and accuracy highly creditable to Mr.
Page 20 - Turks, not only from her actual superiority, but from the opinion generally entertained among that people. In conformity with an ancient prophecy , the Turks consider it as doomed, by their immutable destiny, that they will be driven out of Europe by a neighbouring people, whom they believe to be the Russians, and whose sovereign will enter their capital in triumph. The idea of returning, at some future period, to Asia, whence they came, is tolerably familiar to the most enlightened among them ;...
Page 21 - ... to Asia, whence they came, is tolerably familiar to the most enlightened among them ; and they even appear to consider their establishment in Europe, as nothing more than an encampment. We may therefore easily conceive, that they do not enter the field against Russia, with that joyful ardour which U inspired by a presentiment of victory.
Page 10 - an enlightened sovereign, far from attempting to introduce among them anything of European practice, would rather seek to develope those peculiar qualities, of which the germ evidently exists in these extraordinary people.' There is something in this ; but after all, there is no efficient force like that of a regular army. The spahis, like the cossacks, were wild and disorderly in their attacks, spreading themselves in small bodies, among the rocks and bushes, dashing down narrow passes, and...
Page 20 - Russia is the most formidable enemy of the Turks, not only from her actual superiority, but from the opinion generally entertained among that people. In conformity with an ancient prophecy, the Turks consider it as doomed by their immutable destiny, that they will be driven out of Europe by a neighbouring people, whom they believe to be the Russians, and whose sovereign will enter their capital in triumph. The idea of returning, at some future period, to Asia, whence they came, is tolerably familiar...
Page 41 - Russian army, and who was most actively engaged in the melee, broke in pieces several Turkish sabres, and constantly armed himself with a fresh one taken from the Turks who were slain. The substance from which these valuable sabres are wrought, is called Taban, and they are proved to be genuine, when they admit of being written upon with a ducat or any other piece of fine gold.

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