On the Incarnation (100 Copy Collector's Edition)

Front Cover
Engage Books, Feb 18, 2020 - 108 pages

On the Incarnation is the first classic work of developed Orthodox theology, wherein Saint Athanasius presents teachings on the redemption. Also, Athanasius puts forward the belief, referencing John 1:1-4, that the Son of God, the eternal Word through whom God created the world, entered that world in human form to lead men back into the harmony from which they had earlier fallen away.

His writings were well regarded by all following Church fathers in the West and the East, who noted their rich devotion to the Word-become-man, great pastoral concern and profound interest in monasticism. Athanasius is counted as one of the four great Eastern Doctors of the Church in the Catholic Church. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, he is labeled as the "Father of Orthodoxy." Athanasius is also the first person to identify the same 27 books of the New Testament that are in use today.

This cloth-bound book includes a Victorian inspired dust-jacket, and is limited to 100 copies.

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Students of Church history need this book!

User Review  - Chancellor Carlyle Roberts Ii - Christianbook.com

I bought this book because I'm writing a commentary on the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed of 381 A.D. (which is the modified and expanded version of the Creed put forth by the Council of Nicea at ... Read full review

User Review  - Ricardo Rocha - Christianbook.com

Athanasius reacted against the Arian heresy in the Council of Nicaea and stood firm in defense and affirmation of the Trinity. "On the Incarnation," St.Athanasius goes step by step into the plan of ... Read full review

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About the author (2020)

Athanasius of Alexandria (c. 296-298 - 2 May 373), also called Athanasius the Great, Athanasius the Confessor or, primarily in the Coptic Orthodox Church, Athanasius the Apostolic, was the 20th bishop of Alexandria (as Athanasius I). His intermittent episcopacy spanned 45 years (c. 8 June 328 - 2 May 373), of which over 17 years encompassed five exiles, when he was replaced on the order of four different Roman emperors. Athanasius was a Christian theologian, a Church Father, the chief defender of Trinitarianism against Arianism, and a noted Egyptian leader of the fourth century. Conflict with Arius and Arianism as well as successive Roman emperors shaped Athanasius' career. In 325, at the age of 27, Athanasius began his leading role against the Arians as a deacon and assistant to Bishop Alexander of Alexandria during the First Council of Nicaea. Roman emperor Constantine the Great had convened the council in May-August 325 to address the Arian position that the Son of God, Jesus of Nazareth, is of a distinct substance from the Father. Three years after that council, Athanasius succeeded his mentor as archbishop of Alexandria. In addition to the conflict with the Arians (including powerful and influential Arian churchmen led by Eusebius of Nicomedia), he struggled against the Emperors Constantine, Constantius II, Julian the Apostate and Valens. He was known as Athanasius Contra Mundum (Latin for Athanasius Against the World). Nonetheless, within a few years after his death, Gregory of Nazianzus called him the "Pillar of the Church." He is venerated as a Christian saint, whose feast day is 2 May in Western Christianity, 15 May in the Coptic Orthodox Church, and 18 January in the other Eastern Orthodox Churches. He is venerated by the Oriental and Eastern Orthodox Churches, the Catholic Church, the Lutheran churches, and the Anglican Communion.

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