Civil Society in Central Asia

Front Cover
University of Washington Press, May 1, 2011 - History - 320 pages

Central Asia, known as the home of Tamerlane and the Silk Road, is a crossroads of great cultures and civilizations. In 1991 five nations at the heart of the region Kazakstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan suddenly became independent. Today they sit strategically between Russia, China, and Iran and hold some of the world s largest deposits of oil and natural gas. Long-suppressed ethnic identities are finding new expression in language, religion, and occasional civil conflicts.

Civil Society in Central Asia is a pathbreaking collection of essays by scholars and activists that illuminates the social and institutional forces shaping this important region s future. An appendix provides a guide to projects being carried out by local and international groups.

 

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Contents

Introduction M Holt Ruffin
3
Civil Society in Central Asia S Frederick Starr
27
Central Asia at a Crossroads Scott Horton and Alla Kazakina
34
Freedom of Association and the Question of Its Realization in Kazakhstan Evgeny A Zhovtis
57
Government and Nonprofit Sector Relations in then Kyrgyz Republic Erkinbek Kasybekov
71
Environmental NGOs and the Development of Civil Society in Cental Asia Kate Watters
85
Kolkhoz and Civil Society in the Independent States of Central Asia Olivier Roy
109
Prospects for Development of an Independent Media in Kazakhstan Oleg Katsiev
122
The Emergent Role of Islam Reuel Hanks
158
Islam and Tajikistans Human and Ecological Crisis Aziz Niyazi
180
Womens NGOs in Cental Asias Evolving Societies Ula Ikramova and Kathryn McConnell
198
Sustaining NGO Growth in Central Asia Jay Cooper
214
Organizations
233
Online Resources
311
Appendices
323
Copyright

Can Uzbekistan Build Democracy and Civil Society? Abdumannob Polat
135

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