Surprising adventures of ... baron Munchausen [by R.E. Raspe and others. An abridged version. Wanting the title-leaf].

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Page 13 - What do you say of this, for example? Daylight and powder were spent one day in a Polish forest. When I was going home a terrible bear made up to me in great speed with open mouth, ready to fall upon me. All my pockets were searched in an instant for powder and ball, but in vain; I found nothing but two spare flints : one I flung with all my might into the monster's open jaws, down his throat. It gave him pain and made him turn about, so that I could level the second at his...
Page 3 - ... horizontal position : it fell upon the chief man of the island and killed him on the spot ; he had quitted his house in the storm, under an apprehension of its falling upon him, and was returning through his own garden when this fortunate accident happened. The word "fortunate" here requires some explanation.
Page 5 - I perceived the lion had, by the eagerness with which he sprung at me, jumped forward as I fell, into the crocodile's mouth ! which, as before observed, was wide open ; the head of the one stuck in the throat of the other ! and they were struggling to extricate themselves ! I fortunately recollected my...
Page 26 - I persevered : at last he roared horridly, and stood up almost perpendicular in the water, with his head and shoulders exposed, by which he was discovered by the people on board an Italian trader, then sailing by, who harpooned him in a few minutes. As soon as he was brought on board, I heard the crew consulting how they should cut him up, so as to preserve the greatest quantity of oil. As I understood Italian, I was in most dreadful apprehensions lest their weapons employed in this business should...
Page 22 - Lawrence, when the ship struck with amazing force against (as we supposed) a rock; however, upon heaving the lead, we could find no bottom, even with three hundred fathom. What made this circumstance the more wonderful, and indeed beyond all comprehension, was that the violence of the shock was such that we lost our rudder, broke our bowsprit in the middle, and split all our masts from top to bottom, two of which went by the board. A poor fellow, who was aloft furling the...
Page 57 - I make it a rule always to speak •within compass), there were upwards of five hundred eggs in this nest, and each of them was as large as four common hogsheads or eight barrels, and we could not only see, but hear the young ones chirping within. Having, with great fatigue, cut open one of these eggs, we let out a young one unfeathered, considerably larger than twenty fullgrown vultures. Just as we had given this youngster his liberty, the old kingfisher lighted, and seizing our Captain, who had...
Page 65 - Margate for some time, was seen by several people, and many shots were fired at it; one ball hit the heel of my shoe, but did me no injury. It then directed its course to Dover cliff, where it alighted, and I thought of dismounting, but was prevented by a sudden discharge of musketry from a party of marines that were exercising on the beach ; the balls flew about my head, and rattled on the feathers of the eagle like hailstones ; yet I could not perceive it had received any injury. It instantly reascended...
Page 134 - I received upon the bridge of my nose ; and, but for the bony firmness of that part of my face, it would have descended to my mouth. I still bear the mark upon my nose. He next made a furious blow at my head, but I, parrying, deadened the force of his sabre, so that I received but one scar on my forehead ; and at the same instant, by a blow of my sword, cut off his arm ; and his hand and sabre fell to the earth ; he tottered for some paces, and dropped at the foot of his elephant. That sagacious...
Page 93 - And thus had everything gone to wreck, had I not given instant orders to Gog and Magog to sally forth. They plunged into the water, and swimming on each side, got at length right before the animal, and then seized the reins. Thus they continued swimming on each side, like tritons, holding the muzzle of Sphinx, while I, sallying forth astride upon the creature's back, steered forward on our voyage to the Cape of Good Hope. Arriving at the Cape, I immediately gave orders to repair my former chariot...
Page 12 - But let me rather tell what I have seen myself. Having one day spent all my shot, I found myself unexpectedly in presence of a stately stag, looking at me as unconcernedly as if he had known of my empty pouches. I charged immediately with powder, and upon it a good handful of cherry-stones, for I had sucked the fruit as far the hurry would permit.

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