The Idea of Pakistan

Front Cover
Brookings Institution Press, Sep 21, 2004 - History - 367 pages

In recent years Pakistan has emerged as a strategic player on the world stage—both as a potential rogue state armed with nuclear weapons and as an American ally in the war against terrorism. But our understanding of this country is superficial. To probe beyond the headlines, Stephen Cohen, author of the prize-winning India: Emerging Power, offers a panoramic portrait of this complex country—from its origins as a homeland for Indian Muslims to a militarydominated state that has experienced uneven economic growth, political chaos, sectarian violence, and several nuclear crises with its much larger neighbor, India. Pakistan's future is uncertain. Can it fulfill its promise of joining the community of nations as a moderate Islamic state, at peace with its neighbors, or could it dissolve completely into a failed state, spewing out terrorists and nuclear weapons in several directions? The Idea of Pakistan will be an essential tool for understanding this critically important country.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
1
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
1

India: emerging power

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

India's current foreign policy has evolved from its conflict with Pakistan over Kashmir, the humiliation of having China occupy its northern borderlands in 1962, and the further embarrassment of the ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

give me in urdu

Contents

The Idea of Pakistan
7
The State of Pakistan
31
The Armys Pakistan
57
Political Pakistan
91
Islamic Pakistan
115
Regionalism and Separatism
155
Demographic Educational and Economic Prospects
181
Pakistans Futures
209
American Options
243
NOTES
259
INDEX
297
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - Mahmud utterly ruined the prosperity of the country and performed there wonderful exploits, by which the Hindus became like atoms of dust scattered in all directions and like a tale of old in the mouth of the people.
Page 20 - Very often the hero of one is a foe of the other and, likewise, their victories and defeats overlap. To yoke together two such nations under a single state, one as a numerical minority and the other as a majority, must lead to growing discontent and final destruction...
Page 20 - The Hindus and Muslims belong to two different religious philosophies, social customs, literatures. They neither intermarry nor interdine together, and, indeed, they belong to two different civilisations which are based mainly on conflicting ideas and conceptions. Their aspects on life and of life are different.
Page 14 - LIBERTY will not descend to a people, a people must raise themselves to liberty, it is a blessing that must be earned before it can be enjoyed.
Page 23 - It will intensify their sense of responsibility and deepen their patriotic feeling. Thus, possessing full opportunity of development within the body-politic of India, the North- West Indian Muslims will prove the best defenders of India against a foreign invasion, be that invasion the one of ideas or of bayonets.

About the author (2004)

Stephen Philip Cohen is a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies program at the Brookings Institution. He is the author of classic books on India's and Pakistan's armies and the widely praised India: Emerging Power (Brookings, 2001). He was a member of the Policy Planning Staff of the U.S. Department of State and before joining Brookings was a faculty member at the University of Illinois.

Bibliographic information