Gunfighter Nation: The Myth of the Frontier in Twentieth-century America

Front Cover
University of Oklahoma Press, 1998 - History - 850 pages
2 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
The concluding volume of Richard Slotkin's highly acclaimed trilogy draws on a wide range of sources to examine the pervasive influence of Wild West myths on American culture and politics.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

GUNFIGHTER NATION: The Myth of the Frontier in Twentieth-Century America

User Review  - Kirkus

Concluding a trilogy that began with Regeneration Through Violence (1973) and The Fatal Environment (1985), Slotkin (English/Wesleyan Univ.) now offers a subtle and wide-ranging examination how ... Read full review

Contents

The Significance of the Frontier Myth in
1
The Mythology of Progressivism 18801902
27
Buffalo Bill and
63
Frontier and the Sanctification of Imperialism
79
Modernization
88
Outlaws Detectives
125
Virility Vigilante Politics
156
mington London Garland The Virginian 1902 and the Myth
189
The Zapata
405
Scenario and Vera Cruz 1954
433
Imagining
441
Mystique and the Origin of Special Forces Search and Rescue Search
474
Gunfighter Nation Myth Ideology
487
Watts Newark Detroit 19651967 Exceptional
549
The Mylai Massacre The Wild Bunch
578
The Crisis of Public Myth
624

Origins of the Hardboiled Detective 19101940
217
Colonizing a Mythic Landscape
229
The Studio System the Depression and the Eclipse
255
The Western and
313
Objective Burma 1945 The Problem of Memory Fort
328
Democracy and Force The Western
345
Myth and Genre After the Western Back in the Saddle
643
Imagining America
654
Notes
663
Bibliography
767
Index
829
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1998)

Richar Slotkin is the Olin Professor of American Studies at Wesleyan University. He is the author of Gunfighter Nation and Regeneration Through Violence, both National Book Award Finalists, and The Crater.

Bibliographic information