A system of medicine, ed. by J.R. Reynolds, Volume 4

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Sir John Russell Reynolds
Macmillan and Company, 1877 - Medicine
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Page 575 - It consists in the occurrence of a series of inspirations, increasing to a maximum, and then declining in force and length, until a state of apparent apnoea is established. In this condition the patient may remain for such a length of time as to make his attendants believe that he is dead, when a low inspiration, followed by one more decided, marks the commencement of a new ascending and then descending series of inspirations.
Page 709 - ... the two most ready solutions appear to be, either that the altered quality of the blood affords irregular and unwonted stimulus to the organ immediately; or, that it so affects the minute and capillary circulation, as to render greater action necessary to force the blood through the distant sub-divisions of the vascular system.
Page 185 - Collin, nor those proceeding from pericarditic with valvular murmur, but a mixture of the various attrition murmurs with a large crepitating and a gurgling sound, while to all these phenomena was added a distinct metallic character. In the whole of my experience I never met so extraordinary a combination of sounds. The stomach was not distended by air, and the lung and pleura were unaffected, but the region of the heart gave a tympanitic bruit de pot feU on percussion ; and I could form no conclusion...
Page 573 - ... now know that this typical angina is only the culminating form of a group of symptoms, which in their less pronounced, less definitely painful, and more complicated forms, are found to permeate the whole field of cardiac pathology and diagnosis (p. 570). From his own personal experience he says : — There is often an element of subjective abnormal sensation present in cardiac diseases which, when it is not localised through the coincidence of pain, is a specially indefinable and undescribable...
Page 578 - Gairdner (24), who, writing in 1877, says : — We now know that this typical angina is only the culminating form of a group of symptoms, which in their less pronounced, less definitely painful, and more complicated forms, are found to permeate the whole field of cardiac pathology and diagnosis (p. 570). From his own personal experience he says : — There is often an element of subjective abnormal sensation present in cardiac diseases which, when it is not localised through the coincidence of pain,...
Page 545 - The subjects of angina pectoris report that it is a suffering as sharp as anything that can be conceived in the nature of pain, and that it includes, moreover, something which is beyond the nature of pain, a sense of dying.
Page 570 - Dr. William Hunter, Sir George Baker, Dr. Huck Saunders, and Sir William Fordyce, all came, but could find no pulse ; the pain still continued, and he found himself at times not breathing. Being afraid of death soon taking place if he did not breathe, he produced the voluntary act of breathing, by working his lungs by the power of the will; the sensitive principle, with all its effects on the machine, not being in the least affected by the complaint.
Page 574 - ... localised through the coincidence of pain, is a specially indefinable and undescribable sensation (p. 565). A sensation which can only be called anxiety or cardiac oppression (p. 566). To this group of symptoms he gave the special title angina sine dolore, recognising thereby what he believed to be " its true diagnostic and pathological significance and its alliance with the painful angina of Heberden.
Page 34 - The pairs of the same side succeed each other at intervals, varying from one inch and a half to two inches and a half, the common distance being about two inches.
Page 598 - The result of the first trial of five drops, inhaled during a severe attack in the night, " was truly wonderful. The spasm was, as it were, strangled at its birth. It certainly did not last two minutes, instead of the old weary twenty. And so it continued. The frequency of the paroxysms was not diminished for some time ; but then they were mere bagatelles as compared with their predecessors. Under these improved circumstances, strength gradually returned ; the attacks became less and less frequent,...

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