Early Essays and Leibniz's New Essays Concerning the Human Understanding

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SIU Press, 1969 - Education - 435 pages

Volume 1 of ?The Early Works of John Dewey, 1882?1898” is entitled ?Early Essays and Leibniz's New Essays Concerning the Human Understanding, 1882?1888.” Included here are all Dewey's earliest writings, from his first published article through his book on Leibniz.

The materials in this volume provide a chronological record of Dewey's early development?beginning with the article he sent to the Journal of Speculative Philosophy in 1881 while he was a high-school teacher in Oil City, Pennsylvania, and closing with his widely-acclaimed work on Leibniz in the Grigg's Series of German Philosophical Classics, written when he was an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan. During these years be­tween 1882 and 1888, Dewey's life course was established: he decided to follow a career in philosophy, completed doctoral studies at Johns Hopkins University, became an Instructor at the University of Michigan, was promoted to Assistant Professor, and accepted a position as Chairman of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Minnesota. With the publication of Psychology, he became well known among scholars in this country; a series of articles in the British journal Mind brought him prominence in British philosophical circles. His articles were abstracted in the Revue philosophique.

None of the articles collected in this volume was reprinted during the author's lifetime. For the first time, it is now possible for Dewey scholars to study consecutively in one publication all the essays which originally appeared in many periodicals.

 

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Contents

The Metaphysical Assumptions of Materialism
3
The Pantheism of Spinoza
9
Knowledge and the Relativity of Feeling
19
Kant and Philosophic Method
34
The New Psychology
48
The Obligation to Knowledge of God
61
Health and Sex in Higher Education
69
Psychology in HighSchools from the Standpoint
81
The Sources of His Philosophy
268
The Problem and Its Solution
284
Locke and LeibnizInnate Ideas
299
Sensation and Experience
313
The Impulses and the Will
327
Matter and Its Relation to Spirit
342
Material Phenomena and Their Reality
355
Some Fundamental Conceptions
373

The Place of Religious Emotion
90
Inventory of Philosophy Taught in American
116
The Psychological Standpoint
122
Psychology as Philosophic Method
144
Illusory Psychology
168
Knowledge as Idealization
176
Professor Ladds Elements of Physiological
194
Ethics and Physical Science
205
The Ethics of Democracy
227
Leibnizs New Essays
251
The Nature and Extent of Knowledge
384
The Theology of Leibniz
403
Criticism and Conclusion
414
Illusory Psychology
xxxix
Checklist of references
lviii
List of symbols
lxviii
Emendations in the copytexts Ixxxii
lxxxii
Correction of quotations
lxxxix
Worddivision list хсу
xcv
Copyright

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About the author (1969)

Textual Editor is Jo Ann Boydston, Director of Cooperative Research on Dewey Publications at Southern Illinois University.