The Three Pronunciations of Latin

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New England Publishing Company, 1879 - Latin language - 152 pages
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Page 120 - ... condition of English is an evil. There are many cases where a complex and cunningly-devised machine, dexterously guided, can do that which the congenital hand fails to accomplish ; but the computing of our losses and gains, the striking of our linguistic balance, belongs elsewhere. Suffice it to say, that English is not a language which teaches itself by mere unreflecting usage. It can only be mastered, in all its wealth, in all its power, by conscious, persistent labor...
Page 79 - English feeling that it was evident he did not understand them as we understand them. Two things especially proved this: he frequently mistook declamatory versification of the most mediocre quality for poetry of an elevated order; whilst, on the other hand, his ear failed to perceive the music of the musical poets, as Byron and Tennyson. How could he hear their music, he to whom our English sounds were all unknown? Here, for example, is the way he read 'Claribel': ' At ev ze bittle bommess Azvart...
Page 18 - An inquiry into classical Latin is [an inquiry] into a pronunciation which has not been uttered by an accredited representative for the last seventeen hundred years." (Page 30, edition of 1871.) Yet they have gone back and brought down to our day a pronunciation which purports not to differ from that of Cicero "more than the pronunciation of educated men in one part of England would differ from that heard in other parts.
Page 62 - Just here it should be carefully borne in mind that the reformers insist that their svstem is phonetic. Then "each elementary sound had its own unvarying sign, and each sign its own unvarying sound." This is, according to Prof. March, the essential idea of a phonetic alphabet; this, then, is conceded to be our criterion of judgment. Haldeman, quoting with approval G. Walker, says: "Every letter retained an invariable sound." Quoting from Scheller, he says: "The sound of the long and short vowels,...
Page 39 - ... k quidem in nullis verbis utendum puto nisi quae significat etiam ut sola ponatur. hoc eo non omisi, quod quidam earn, quotiens a sequatur, necessariam credunt, cum sit с littera, quae ad omnis vocalis vim suam perferat.
Page 150 - Corssen and other eminent philologists, and now employed in its essential features in the Universities and leading schools of England, and in Harvard, Cornell, and other institutions of this country, as being proved beyond question a close approximation to the Roman pronunciation in the time of Cicero.
Page 6 - The following are the general rules for the division of words into syllables. 1. A single consonant between two vowels, must be joined to the latter syllable...
Page 77 - I have elsewhere seen) in 224, 3, it will be found that nomen, nominis is quite consistent with other words, and that these laws, be their basis what it may, do not depend on the syllable being open or shut. The following is a summary statement of the probable pronunciation of educated Romans in the period from Cicero to Quintilian, say 70 Ac to 90 PC...
Page 21 - ... distinguished Latinist of Yale College, Prof. Thacher, in his Preface to Madvig's Grammar, affirms : ' ' How the Romans themselves pronounced their language is not known, nor can it ever be known. Scholars may not agree in opinion in respect to the extent of this ignorance ; but if it were in itself very limited, pertaining, for instance, only to the sound of a single letter, it might with reason be made an objection...

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