The Dispossessed

Front Cover
Avon, 1975 - Fiction - 311 pages
A bleak moon settled by utopian anarchists, Anarres has long been isolated from other worlds, including its mother planet, Urras--a civilization of warring nations, great poverty, and immense wealth. Now Shevek, a brilliant physicist, is determined to reunite the two planets, which have been divided by centuries of distrust. He will seek answers, question the unquestionable, and attempt to tear down the walls of hatred that have kept them apart. To visit Urras will require great sacrifice and risks, which Shevek willingly accepts. But the ambitious scientist's gift is soon seen as a threat, and in the profound conflict that ensues, he must reexamine his beliefs even as he ignites the fires of change.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
46
4 stars
34
3 stars
14
2 stars
4
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wishanem - LibraryThing

This is the story of a scientist from a very poor anarchist society who spends some time visiting a totalitarian capitalist oligarchy. There is some subtlety and depth to the society that the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RajivC - LibraryThing

People fear original thinkers. If there is one thing that I will take away from the book, it is this lesson. “The Dispossessed” is a strange book, and probably deserves a second reading. You can read ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
3
Section 3
21
Copyright

34 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1975)

Ursula K. Le Guin was born Ursula Kroeber in Berkeley, California on October 21, 1929. She received a bachelor's degree from Radcliffe College in 1951 and a master's degree in romance literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance from Columbia University in 1952. She won a Fulbright fellowship in 1953 to study in Paris, where she met and married Charles Le Guin. Her first science-fiction novel, Rocannon's World, was published in 1966. Her other books included the Earthsea series, The Left Hand of Darkness, The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia, The Lathe of Heaven, Four Ways to Forgiveness, and The Telling. A Wizard of Earthsea received an American Library Association Notable Book citation, a Horn Book Honor List citation, and the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1979. She received the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters in 2014. She also received the Nebula Award and the Hugo Award. She also wrote books of poetry, short stories collections, collections of essays, children's books, a guide for writers, and volumes of translation including the Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu and selected poems by Gabriela Mistral. She died on January 22, 2018 at the age of 88.

Bibliographic information