The Man Who Saved Britain: A Personal Journey Into the Disturbing World of James Bond

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Macmillan, Oct 2, 2007 - History - 287 pages
26 Reviews
Bond. James Bond. The ultimate British hero--suave, stoic, gadget-driven--was, more than anything, the necessary invention of a traumatized country whose self-image as a great power had just been shattered by the Second World War. By inventing the parallel world of secret British greatness and glamour, Ian Fleming fabricated an icon that has endured long past its maker's death. In The Man Who Saved Britain, Simon Winder lovingly and ruefully re-creates the nadirs of his own fandom while illuminating what Bond says about sex, the monarchy, food, class, attitudes toward America, and everything in between. The result is an insightful and, above all, entertaining exploration of postwar Britain under the influence of the legendary Agent 007.
 

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Review: The Man Who Saved Britain: A Personal Journey into the Disturbing World of James Bond

User Review  - David Spalding - Goodreads

Entertaining though highly personal (and therefore not the least bit objective to my eye) view of Ian Fleming's literary creation in the social history of post-War Britain. Intriguing insights and observations. Fun to read before watching THE HOUR, for two views of late 1950s England. Read full review

Review: The Man Who Saved Britain: A Personal Journey into the Disturbing World of James Bond

User Review  - Russell Haywood - Goodreads

Opinionated but enjoyable rant. Has spurred me on to investigate more substantial and measured analyses of the same time period Read full review

Contents

IV
3
V
30
VI
67
VII
104
VIII
136
IX
179
X
214
XI
244
XII
277
XIII
287
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About the author (2007)

Simon Winder is the editor of several anthologies, including the highly praised Night Thoughts. He works in publishing and lives in London.

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