A Practical Treatise on Locomotive Engines Upon Railways ...

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E. L. Carey & A. Hart, 1836 - Locomotives - 304 pages
 

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Page 18 - ... intended purpose. After that, we shall have to consider several additional dispositions proper to the engine, which may exercise more or less influence on the expected effect ; and we shall then also treat of some external circumstances, the result of which may be of the same nature. Lastly, we shall speak of the fulcrum of the motion, or of the force of adhesion of the wheel to the rails ; and our last chapter will contain a calculation of the quantity of fuel required for the traction of given...
Page 22 - H, extending outside of the boiler, and which is managed by the engineer. The operation of the machine is as follows : The steam being generated in great abundance, in the boiler, and being unable to escape out of it, acquires a considerable degree of elastic force. If, at that moment, the cock, V, is opened, by the handle...
Page i - FOUNDED UPON A GREAT MANY NEW EXPERIMENTS made on a large scale, in a daily practice on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, with many different Engines and considerable trains of Carriages. To which is added, an APPENDIX, showing the expense of conveying Goods by means of Locomotives on Railroads.
Page 288 - ISi oz. The number of gross tons that had passed on the rail, during that time, was estimated at 600,000. Thus we see that with so considerable a tonnage, and with the velocity of the motion on that railway, the annual loss of the rail was only ¥|~j. of its primitive weight ; so that it would require more than a hundred years to reduce it to the half of its present strength.
Page 177 - Corresponding temperature by Fahrenheit's thermometer. Volume of the steam compared to the volume of the water that produced it. In Ibs.
Page 36 - Springs resting at oo on the chairs of the wheels, by means of vertical pins passing through holes in the frame of the engine. One end of the pin resting on the back of the spring, and the other on the upper side of the chair ; the whole weight of the machine is thus supported by the wheels, but through the intermediate action of the springs.
Page 18 - Lastly, we shall speak of the fulcrum of the motion, or of the force of adhesion of the wheel to the rails ; and our last chapter will contain a calculation of the quantity of fuel required for the traction of given loads. " These inquiries will be sufficient to solve all the most important questions concerning the application of locomotive engines to the draft of loads. " They will sometimes be necessarily subdivided into several branches, and require calculation and theoretical illustrations, of...

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