Travels in Circassia, Krim Tartary, &c

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1837
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Page 327 - I was made acquainted with their manner of procuring sugar, which is derived from the walnut tree, that flourishes here in extraordinary perfection. During spring, just as the sap is rising, the trunk is pierced, and a spigot left in it for some time : when this is withdrawn, a clear sweet liquor flows out, which is left to coagulate, and on some occasions they refine it. For diseases of the lungs, and general debility, they consider it a most valuable medicine.
Page 28 - Saviour was a member of their community, and that he entertained the same opinions as themselves, with respect to the interpolations of the rabbins: in support of which belief, they adduce his repeated and violent denunciations against the rabbinical interpretations, and most positively deny that any member of their sect was, in the slightest degree, implicated in the crucifixion.
Page 26 - JEWS. town to a steep flight of steps, leading to what is termed the valley of Jehosaphat, situate in a chasm of the rocks. This is the cemetry of the sect, resembling a beautiful grove, shaded by the dark foliage of a thousand trees, forming a striking contrast to the white marble tombs and gloomy beetling rocks that seem to threaten destruction at every step. Here several tombs were pointed out to me, bearing inscriptions in the Hebrew language, so far back as the fourteenth century : thus proving...
Page 199 - Caucasus not so much for the value of the territory as [for its significance as] a pied a terre to prepare for future conquests. Can we, therefore, wonder at the suppressed murmur of universal hatred which is heard throughout the East at the very name of Russia? Every advantage gained by the Circassians over their oppressors is hailed by the Oriental, whether Mahometan, Christian or Jew, with the most enthusiastic delight. Of the sacrifices and generosity of the Turks in behalf of the poor mountaineers,...
Page 428 - CHATEAUBRIAND'S SKETCHES OF THE LITERATURE OF ENGLAND. Second Edition. 2 vols. 8vo. 24s. " There has not appeared, for a long time, any work so calculated to pique the curiosity of the literary world as this new production of the celebrated Chateaubriand, in which he discusses the merits of Shakspeare, Milton, Byron, and the whole galaxy of ancient as well as modern English writers ; drawing the most curious comparisons and analogies.
Page 232 - A SERENADE IN CIRCASSIA WAR-CRY OF THE CIRCASSIANS INTRODUCTION TO THE FAMILY OF THE CHIEF BEAUTY OF THE WOMEN THEIR MANNERS AND COSTUME — OCCUPATIONS OF THE CIRCASSIANS. To attempt giving you a detailed description of my route is impossible, as it lay across a country, wild as if no other foot had trodden it save that of the beasts of the forest ; it was not merely up hill and down dale, but over a succession of dizzy precipices, savage glens, and frightful denies, bared, broken, entwined, and...
Page 138 - Tartar bride is not allowed to speak a word louder than a whisper, not even with her own parents...
Page 225 - ... cross-legged ; and, I assure you, I felt not a little pleasure, when the ceremony was over, to take a ramble through the grounds. " The clustered dwellings of my host, which might be said to resemble a little hamlet, were pleasantly situated on a rising eminence sloping down to the banks of a rivulet; and, being surrounded by grounds, divided, with no little judgment, into gardens, orchards, paddocks, meadows, and corn-fields, animated, here and there, with flocks of sheep and herds of cattle,...
Page 244 - ... Europe, of the advantage of a pretty person, use every artificial means, by cosmetics, &c., to improve their beauty. Still, the traveller who may read my account, and expects to find the whole population such as I have described, will be wofully disappointed, should he find himself, on arriving in Circassia, surrounded by a tribe of Nogay Tartars, Calmucks, Turcomans, or even the Lesghi. The latter, however, a fine warlike race, are nearly equal, in personal appearance, to the Circassians, but...
Page 246 - ... the whole wardrobe of finery being reserved for visits of ceremony. My host was equally industrious ; for, besides building, with his own princely hands, the little cottages he occupied, he was his own carpenter, tanner, and weaver, mounted his pistols and guns, manufactured his inimitable bows and arrows; and, like old King Priam, in conjunction with his princely boys, tilled the land, and tended his flocks and herds in the mountains ; and, when the wintry snow rendered his occupations in the...

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