Deterring Democracy

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Macmillan, Apr 6, 1992 - Political Science - 455 pages
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From World War II until the 1980s, the United States reigned supreme as both the economic and the military leader of the world. The major shifts in global politics that came about with the dismantling of the Eastern bloc have left the United States unchallenged as the preeminent military power, but American economic might has declined drastically in the face of competition, first from Germany and Japan ad more recently from newly prosperous countries elsewhere. In Deterring Democracy, the impassioned dissident intellectual Noam Chomsky points to the potentially catastrophic consequences of this new imbalance. Chomsky reveals a world in which the United States exploits its advantage ruthlessly to enforce its national interests--and in the process destroys weaker nations. The new world order (in which the New World give the orders) has arrived.

 

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It is almost twenty years since Noam Chomsky published Deterring Democracy. Its contemporary context is an important starting point in the understanding of its position since most of the material ... Read full review

Deterring democracy

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This collection of essays emphasizes the destructive impact of American foreign policy in Central America. Supporting chapters interpret the origins of American global intervention, the creation of ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
ONE Cold War Fact and Fancy
9
TWO The Home Front
69
THREE The Global System
89
FOUR Problems of Population Control
107
FIVE The PostCold War Era
139
SIX Nefarious Aggression
179
SEVEN The Victors
215
EIGHT The Agenda of the Doves 1988
253
NINE The Mortal Sin of SelfDefense
283
TEN The Decline of the Democratic Ideal
303
ELEVEN Democracy in the Industrial Societies
331
TWELVE Force and Opinion
351
Afterword
407
Index
441
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About the author (1992)

Noam Chomsky, the Ferrai P. Ward Professor of Modern Languages and Linguistics at the Masschusetts Institute of Technology, is the author of many books on both langauge and politics, including most recently Rethinking Camelot: John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, and U.S. Political Culture; Language and Thought; and World Orders, Old and New.

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