And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?

Front Cover
Demco Media, 1996 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 45 pages
9 Reviews
Everyone knows about Paul Revere's big ride to Lexington. But not everyone knows the harrowing details and narrow escapes along the way. Did you know that Paul Revere forgot his spurs on his famous ride. Or that he whittled false teeth to make extra money? A New York Times Outstanding Book of the Year. A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. An ALA Notable Children's Book. Full color.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - anunez1 - LibraryThing

In this biography of Paul Revere we as the reader learn so much that it makes this book a good read. I enjoyed this book for its great reference to specific parts of history such as the Boston Tea ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - csmith109 - LibraryThing

In my opinion this is a great book on Paul Revere. The language used throughout this book is so descriptive the reader feels as if they have traveled back in time and are visiting with Paul. On page 5 ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
6
Section 2
31
Section 3
36
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About the author (1996)

Jean Fritz was born in Hankow, China on November 16, 1915. She received a bachelor's degree in English from Wheaton College in 1937. She wrote picture books and historical fiction before focusing on historical nonfiction. Her first book, Bunny Hopewell's First Spring, was published in 1954. Her other books included And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?; Will You Sign Here, John Hancock?; Can't You Make Them Behave, King George?; Shh! We're Writing the Constitution; Traitor: The Case of Benedict Arnold; Where Do You Think You're Going, Christopher Columbus?; Who's That Stepping on Plymouth Rock?; The Double Life of Pocahontas; and George Washington's Mother. Homesick: My Own Story, a collection of linked narratives, traces her life from her girlhood in China to her longed-for yet uneasy passage to America. It won a National Book Award and was named a Newbery Honor Book. She received the Regina Medal by the Catholic Library Association, the National Humanities Medal, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award and the Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature for her body of work. She died on May 14, 2017 at the age of 101.

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