Foucault's Pendulum

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Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1989 - Fiction - 641 pages
8 Reviews
"As brilliant and quirky as THE NAME OF THE ROSE, as mischievous and wide-raning....A virtuoso performance."
THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
Three clever book editors, inspired by an extraordinary fable they heard years befoe, decide to have a little fun. Randomly feeding esoteric bits of knowledge into an incredible computer capable of inventing connections between all their entires, they think they are creating a long lazy game--until the game starts taking over....
Here is an incredible journey of thought and history, memory and fantasy, a tour de force as enthralling as anything Umberto Eco--or indeed anyone--has ever devised.

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A Truly Amazing Work

User Review  - Seki - Borders

This book is truly a masterpiece, dealing with Templar, and how mankind processes and deals with information, and how it was used to the misuse of the main characters. So far, I am only gotten through ... Read full review

Foucault's pendulum

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Student of philology in 1970s Milan, Casaubon is completing a thesis on the Templars, a monastic knighthood disbanded in the 1300s for questionable practices. At Pilades Bar, he meets up with Jacopo ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
119
Section 2
134
Section 3
418
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

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Postmodernity
Barry Smart
No preview available - 1993
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About the author (1989)

Umberto Eco was born in Alessandria, Italy on January 5, 1932. He received a doctorate of philosophy from the University of Turin in 1954. His first book, Il Problema Estetico in San Tommaso, was an extension of his doctoral thesis on St. Thomas Aquinas and was published in 1956. His first novel, The Name of the Rose, was published in 1980 and won the Premio Strega and the Premio Anghiar awards in 1981. His other works include Foucault's Pendulum, The Island of the Day Before, and The Prague Cementary.

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