Letters, Archaeological and Historical: Relating to the Isle of Wight, Volume 1

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Contents

Caedwalla in the Isle of Wight and what he did there a d 687
76
The Solent or Conflict of the Tides and the Tin trade
86
Danish Invasions of the Isle of Wight
93
Christianity in the Isle of Wight in the ninth and tenth
95
W its name manor and Church of St Swithuns 1
104
AngloNorman Christianity in the Isle of Wight a d 1066
115
The Norman Conquest of the Isle of Wight
126
From the forfeiture of the Lordship of the Isle of Wight till
132
Christianity in the Isle of Wight from the death of Alfred to
141
The Excavations at Quarr Abbey and the Cistercians
151
The Cistercian Abbey of Quarr
163
Gods House Southampton and the Manor of Cosham Isle
172
Christianity in the Isle of Wight during the twelfth century I
178
Three Visits of King John to the Isle of Wighta d 1201
190
Isabella de Fortibus the Lady of the Isle of Wight
202
High Sheriffs of Hampshire connected with the Isle of Wight
212
Seal of a Papal Bull of the thirteenth century found at Caris
218
Newport and its Corporation in the thirteenth century 927
227
The Coroners Court and Chaucer 935
237
Kerne and the Knights Templars
246
Farm Stock and Agricultural Prices at the end of the thirteenth
255
Gods House Southampton and the Manors of Werrer
262
St Dominic and the Convent at Carisbrooke 370
270
The Lordship of the Isle of Wight in the twelfth and earlier
279
A Day at Carisbrooke Priory in the thirteenth century
291
The Isle of Wight and Winchester Cathedral
298
The History of Christianity in the Isle of Wight in the thirteenth
306
The Seizure of Carisbrooke Priory by Edward the First
317
The Glamorgan Family in the Isle of Wight and Clamerkins
324
Godshill Church and the Dispute between the Regulars
333
Archbishop Chichelcy 1
403
The Good Duke of Gloucester and the Lordship of the Isle
414
The Petitions of the Isle of Wight to the King and Parliament
423
The Woodville Arms at Carisbrooke Castle
432
The Tomb of Margaret Wadham at Carisbrooke Church
445
The Isle of Wight in the beginning of the fifteenth century
451
Christianity in the Isle of Wight during the first half of
457
Whitwell and St Rhadigund
467
Codshill and Dr Cole
474
The Worsleys of the Isle of Wight
481
The Reformation in the Isle of Wight in the reign of Edward VI
490
Thomas Cromwell Earl of Essex Constable of Carisbrooke
498
The Parish Registers of Newchurch Carisbrooke Niton
508
Attempt to betray the Isle of Wight and Hurst Castle to
515
Mottistone and Sir John Cheke
530
Sir John Oglander and the Dillington Family
538
The Corporation of Newport at Carisbrooke Castle a d 1567
551
Thomas James D D first Bodleian Librarian a d 15711622
558
Archbishop Parkers Visitation of the Isle of Wight a d 1575 I
567
William Keeling a d 15771619 I
578
The CocosKeeling Islands
588
Sir Faithful Fortescue a d 15811666
600
The Plague in Newport I W a d 158384 I
608
The Parliamentary Borough of Newport I W
618
The Marriage of Alexander Ross with Barbara Bowreman
624
How the Isle of Wight was defended a d 1588 I
631
The Spanish Fleet off the Isle of Wight and the Carisbrooke
642
The Stephens Family in the Isle of Wight I
649
Anne Clifford Countess of Dorset Pembroke and Montgomery
665
The Defences of Carisbrooke Castle a d 1508
672

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Page 644 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Page 677 - As if here were those cooler shades of love. Can such delights be in the street And open fields, and we not see't?
Page 591 - Here they should feed on fat beef and mutton, till nothing but their fulness should stint their stomachs; yea, they should feed on the labours of their own hands, enjoying a proportionable profit of their pains to themselves ; their beds should be good, and their bedfellows better, seeing the richest yeomen in England would not disdain to marry their daughters unto them...
Page 148 - The clergy, contented with a very slight degree of learning, could scarcely stammer out the words of the sacraments; and a person who understood grammar, was an object of wonder and astonishment. The monks mocked the rule of their order by fine vestments, and the use of every kind of food. The nobility, given up to luxury and wantonness, went not to church in the morning after the manner of Christians, but merely, in a careless manner, heard matins and masses from a hurrying priest in their chambers,...
Page 363 - In the stead of long fronts of venerable colleges, of stately walks beneath immemorial elms, history plunges us into the mean and filthy lanes of a mediaeval town. Thousands of boys, huddled in bare lodging-houses, clustering round teachers as poor as themselves in church porch and house porch, drinking, quarrelling, dicing, begging at the corners of the streets, take the place of the brightly-coloured train of doctors and Heads. Mayor and Chancellor struggled in vain to enforce order or peace on...
Page 627 - ... cannot be resisted on the coast of England, without a fleet to impeach it; no, nor on the coast of France, or any other country ; except every creek, port, or sandy bay, had a powerful army, in each of them, to make opposition.
Page 111 - Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree's shade, Where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap, Each in his narrow cell forever laid, The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
Page 625 - If men could learn from history, what lessons it might teach us ! But passion and party blind our eyes, and the light which experience gives is a lantern on the stern, which shines only on the waves behind us ! DECEMBER 27, 1831.
Page 38 - Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona ; for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven. And I say also unto thee, that thou art Peter, and upon this rock will I build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
Page 307 - Parchment and paper, printing and engraving, improved glass and steel, gunpowder, clocks, telescopes, the mariner's compass, the reformed calendar, the decimal notation, algebra, trigonometry, chemistry, counterpoint, an invention equivalent to a new creation of music ; — these are all possessions which we inherit from that which has been so disparagingly termed the Stationary Period.

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