The Beautiful Necessity: Seven Essays on Theosophy and Architecture

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Manas Press, 1910 - Architecture - 93 pages
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Page 50 - There is but one Temple in the World; and that is the Body of Man. Nothing is holier than this high form. Bending before men is a reverence done to this Revelation in the Flesh. We touch Heaven, when we lay our hand on a human body...
Page 23 - No doubt is now entertained that beauty is subject to laws and rules dependent on the nature of human intelligence. The difficulty consists in the fact that these laws and rules, on whose fulfilment beauty depends and by which it must be judged, are not consciously present to the mind, either of the artist who creates the work, or the observer who contemplates it. Art works with design, but the work of art ought to have the appearance of being undesigned, and must be judged on that ground.
Page 34 - ... three elementary forms, namely, the pier, the lintel and the arch. These are the three, the only three letters, from which has expanded the Architectural Art as a great and superb language wherewith Man has expressed, through the generations, the changing drift of his thoughts.
Page 23 - Necessity which rules the world, which is a law of nature and equally a law of art, for art is idealized creation: nature carried to a higher power by reason of its passage through a human consciousness. Thought and emotion tend to crystallize into forms of beauty as inevitably as does the frost on a window pane. Art, therefore, in one of its aspects is the weaving of a pattern, the communication of an order and a method to the material or medium employed.
Page 98 - To renew the charge, book must be brought to the desk. TWO WEEK BOOK DO NOT RETURN BOOKS ON SUNDAY DATE DUE UNIVERSITY Of MICHIGAN 3 9015...
Page 10 - They specially called attention to the fact that polarity, that is, the sundering of a force into two qualitatively different and opposed activities striving after reunion, which also shows itself for the most part in space as a dispersion in opposite directions, is a fundamental type of almost all the phenomena of nature, from the magnet and the crystal to man himself.
Page 39 - Thus it is seen that in a work of art, as in a piece of tapestry, the same thread runs through the web, but goes to make up different figures. The idea is deeply theosophic: one life, many manifestations; hence, inevitably, echoes, resemblances — Consonance.
Page 60 - ... composition, the laws of perspective, and the illusions of chiaroscuro, he developed to the utmost. To find a darker darkness and a brighter brightness than had yet been shown upon the painter's canvas ; to solve problems of foreshortening ; to deceive the "eye by finely graduated tones and subtle touches ; to submit the freest play of form to simple figures of geometry in grouping, were among the objects he most earnestly pursued.
Page 22 - There is a Beautiful Necessity which rules the world, which is a law of nature and equally a law of art, for art is idealized creation: nature carried to a higher power by reason of its passage through a human consciousness.
Page 23 - ... are not consciously present in the mind of the artist who creates the result. "Art creates," says Helmholtz, "as imagination pictures, regularly without conscious law, designedly without conscious aim.

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