The American Kriegsspiel: A Game for Practicing the Art of War Upon a Topographical Map

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Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1879 - Tactics - 128 pages
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Page 24 - ... military operations. They are intended to facilitate and hasten the game and should not be so perverted as to retard it. The reduction in the rate of march can almost always be estimated ; only the important factors should be considered in modifying the effect of fire ; unimportant fires should be neglected ; the fatigue may be neglected until the players show...
Page 47 - If their position is not lying down in the open plain, but mounted on horseback, 12 per cent; if standing, 80 per cent; if kneeling, 90 per cent; if they are firing from behind a log, an embankment, or a window sill, which not only shelters them from hostile fire but affords a suitable rest for the pieces, their fire may be taken at 120 • per cent of the standard.
Page 45 - And now — an example of a planning factor used in the American Kriegsspiel; from it you will see that the player found himself dealing with a tremendous amount of fine detail. "If one company of infantry, comprising 64 men armed with breech— loading rifled muskets, is deployed as skirmishers lying down and firing at the rate of about six rounds in a minute, at another line directly in front of it and distant about 500 yards lying down in an open plain, at intervals of two and a half yards or...
Page 15 - The-. _ length of the move in every case should be defiwi .mined by the time that would elapse before the conduct of one side would be so modified by that of the other that a truthful representation of warfare would make it necessary for the troop-leaders to know what had transpired before making further indications.
Page 46 - ... ground to have formed a fair conception of the distance, it may be inferred that it will inflict a loss in killed and wounded, at the average rate of not less than .90 men in a minute, as shown by the scale for infantry fire on the firing board.

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