Networks in Tropical Medicine: Internationalism, Colonialism, and the Rise of a Medical Specialty, 1890–1930

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Stanford University Press, Feb 29, 2012 - History - 312 pages
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Networks in Tropical Medicine explores how European doctors and scientists worked together across borders to establish the new field of tropical medicine in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The book shows that this transnational collaboration in a context of European colonialism, scientific discovery, and internationalism shaped the character of the new medical specialty. Even in an era of intense competition among European states, practitioners of tropical medicine created a transnational scientific community through which they influenced each other and the health care that was introduced to the tropical world. One of the most important developments in the shaping of tropical medicine as a specialty was the major sleeping sickness epidemic that spread across sub-Saharan Africa at the turn of the century. The book describes how scientists and doctors collaborated across borders to control, contain, and find a treatment for the disease. It demonstrates that these medical specialists' shared notions of "Europeanness," rooted in common beliefs about scientific, technological, and racial superiority, led them to establish a colonial medical practice in Africa that sometimes oppressed the same people it was created to help.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Building Networks in Tropical Medicine
12
Teachers Students and the Culture of Tropical Medicine
44
Medical Experts and Public Health in Douala and Brazzaville
73
The Sleeping Sickness Campaigns 19011910
103
5 Sleeping Sickness Campaigns in German Cameroon and French Equatorial Africa
138
Sleeping Sickness Drug Therapy Research 19031914
165
World War I and Its Impact on Transnational Tropical Medicine
182
Conclusion
205
Notes
211
Bibliography
251
Index
281
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Deborah Neill is Assistant Professor of History at York University.

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