Before and After Hegel: A Historical Introduction to Hegel's Thought

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University of California Press, Jan 1, 1993 - Philosophy - 211 pages
In this engaging and accessible introduction to Hegel's theory of knowledge, Tom Rockmore presents the philosopher's ideas the way Hegel himself saw them: as coming to grips with, even competing with, prior philosophical positions. Carefully laying out the philosophical tradition of German idealism, he concisely explicates the theories of Kant, Fichte, and Schelling, essential to an understanding of Hegel's thought.
Rockmore shows how Hegel first formulates his own position in relation to the philosophical discussion of his own historical moment, before extending the discussion, in a second phase, to the entire historical tradition. The Hegelian system, according to Rockmore, remains an essentially modern conception of knowledge, surprisingly relevant to our contemporary intellectual situation.
Rockmore's remarkably lucid book will interest general readers as well as students of philosophy, intellectual history, politics, culture, and society. In this engaging and accessible introduction to Hegel's theory of knowledge, Tom Rockmore presents the philosopher's ideas the way Hegel himself saw them: as coming to grips with, even competing with, prior philosophical positions. Carefully laying out the philosophical tradition of German idealism, he concisely explicates the theories of Kant, Fichte, and Schelling, essential to an understanding of Hegel's thought.
Rockmore shows how Hegel first formulates his own position in relation to the philosophical discussion of his own historical moment, before extending the discussion, in a second phase, to the entire historical tradition. The Hegelian system, according to Rockmore, remains an essentially modern conception of knowledge, surprisingly relevant to our contemporary intellectual situation.
Rockmore's remarkably lucid book will interest general readers as well as students of philosophy, intellectual history, politics, culture, and society.
 

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Contents

The Reception of the Critical Philosophy
13
Reinhold and the Rationalist Idea
22
Fichte Intervenes in the Debate
29
An Unfounded System of Knowledge
36
Hegels Writings
44
Some Main Themes
54
The Difference
65
The Science of Logic
107
The Philosophy of Right
128
After Hegel
135
Notes
175
Bibliography
201
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About the author (1993)

Tom Rockmore is Professor of Philosophy at Duquesne University and author of On Heidegger's Nazism and Philosophy (California, 1992).

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