Happy Days: Mencken's Autobiography: 1880-1892, Volume 1

Front Cover
JHU Press, Aug 28, 2006 - Biography & Autobiography - 336 pages
0 Reviews

With a style that combined biting sarcasm with the "language of the free lunch counter," Henry Louis Mencken shook politics and politicians for nearly half a century. Now, fifty years after Mencken’s death, the Johns Hopkins University Press announces The Buncombe Collection, newly packaged editions of nine Mencken classics: Happy Days, Heathen Days, Newspaper Days, Prejudices, Treatise on the Gods, On Politics, Thirty-Five Years of Newspaper Work, Minority Report, and A Second Mencken Chrestomathy.

Most of these autobiographical writings first appeared in the New Yorker. Here Mencken recalls memories of a safe and happy boyhood in the Baltimore of the 1880s.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

HAPPY DAYS: Mencken's Autobiography: 1880-1892 (maryland Paperback Bookshelf)

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Reminiscences of the author's boyhood in Baltimore that will delight more than the usual Mencken satellites. An enjoyable delight in days past, a mellow recalling of childhood episodes, family affairs ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction to the Universe
3
The Caves of Learning
19
in Recollections of Academic Orgies
39
The Baltimore of the Eighties
54
Rural Delights
74
The Head of the House
91
Memorials of Gormandizing
106
vin The Training of a Gangster
119
The Ruin of an Artist
189
XHI In the Footsteps of Gutenberg
202
From the Records of an Athlete
218
The Capital of the Republic
232
Recreations of a Reactionary
247
Brief Gust of Glory
263
The Career of a Philosopher
277
Innocence in a Wicked World
291

Cops and Their Ways
143
Larval Stage of a Bookworm
157
First Steps in Divinity
176
Strange Scenes and Far Places
301
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Henry Louis Mencken was born in Baltimore in 1880 and remained a lifelong resident. Opinionated and controversial, he wrote columns for the Baltimore Evening Sun that earned him a national reputation. He died in 1956.