The Great Feminist Denial (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Melbourne Univ. Publishing, Sep 1, 2008 - Social Science - 248 pages
4 Reviews
What the hell happened?
In The Great Feminist Denial the authors talk with women feminists and non-feminists, young and old, famous and not famous, child-free and with child and use their responses as a starting point from which to refocus the key debates.
Dux and Simic argue that, ultimately, feminism is still necessary for everyday life. Even the most cursory glimpse at the social and cultural landscape suggests an urgent need for a politics that identifies inequalities, differences and strengths specific to women as a sex.
The Great Feminist Denial puts an ailing feminist past to rest, and proposes a way forward that offers young women of today a new way of calling themselves feminists.
  

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Review: The Great Feminist Denial

User Review  - Simone - Goodreads

If you know nothing about feminism and want a brief introduction into some ideas but don't want to walk away with all the answers, this book is for you. not bad but not great. Read full review

Review: The Great Feminist Denial

User Review  - Goodreads

If you know nothing about feminism and want a brief introduction into some ideas but don't want to walk away with all the answers, this book is for you. not bad but not great. Read full review

Contents

Are we there yet?
3
The straw feminist within
27
Feminism and the media
43
Feminism stole my babies
73
Women and work
95
Poledancing for beginners
123
We are all feminists now except the feminists
151
Removing the denialcoloured glasses
179
Epilogue
204
Notes
212
Bibliography
226
Acknowledgements
241
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Monica Dux has worked in the media, publishing and academia and writes regularly for The Age and The Australian. She grew up in Sydney and now lives in Melbourne with her partner and children.
Zora Simic wrote her PhD on Australian feminism at the University of Sydney. She is currently a lecturer in Australian History at the University of Melbourne and contributes regular reviews to journals and magazines.

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