Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening

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Diane Publishing Company, May 1, 2004 - Poetry - 27 pages
3 Reviews
The poem that begins 3Whose woods these are I think I know2 holds a special place in American hearts. Robert Frost is a poet who spoke to everyone, but rarely more memorably than in this evocation of the quiet delights of winter. Jeffers brings the wintry woods to life with richly detailed, subtly colored artwork. She captures the patterns of bare branches against the sky and the silent fury of a snowstorm. Her kindly narrator exudes a childlike joy as he stops to appreciate the beauty of a snowy afternoon. Readers will delight in the way he fulfills his 3promises to keep2 before he is off again in his sleigh, with many miles to go before he can sleep. A perfect book for introducing children to great Amer. lit. Its elegance and magic will be cherished by everyone.

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This poem is really great I wish everyone would read it.

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It is my best poem. It gave my inspirations. For those who wants to be amusing, this poem teaches how a human being should have a vision.

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About the author (2004)

Robert Frost, the quintessential poet of New England, was born in San Francisco in 1874. He was educated at Dartmouth College and Harvard University. Although he managed to support himself working solely as a poet for most of his life and holding various posts with a number of universities, as a young man he was employed as a bobbin boy in a mill, a cobbler, a schoolteacher, and a farmer. Frost, whose poetry focuses on natural images of New England, received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry four times for: New Hampshire, Collected Poems, A Further Range, and A Witness Tree. His works are noted for combining characteristics of both romanticism and modernism. He also wrote A Boy's Will, North of Boston, Mountain Interval, and The Gift Outright, among others. Frost married Elinor Miriam White in 1895, and they had six children--Elliott, Lesley, Carol, Irma, Marjorie, and Elinor Bettina. He died in Boston in 1963.

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