The Theory of Moral Sentiments: To which is Added, a Dissertation on the Origin of Languages

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A. Millar, A. Kincaid and J. Bell in Edinburgh; and sold, 1767 - Conduct of life - 478 pages
 

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Contents

I
1
V
10
VI
16
VII
21
IX
30
X
37
XI
38
XII
45
XXXV
161
XXXVI
164
XXXVII
170
XXXIX
185
XL
191
XLI
198
XLII
229
XLIII
247

XIII
51
XV
60
XVI
64
XVII
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XVIII
83
XX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIV
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XXVI
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XXVIII
121
XXX
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XXXI
132
XXXII
140
XXXIII
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XLIV
263
XLV
278
XLVI
291
XLVII
303
XLVIII
325
XLIX
328
L
330
LI
348
LIII
359
LIV
370
LV
387
LVI
388
LVII
393
LVIII
399
LIX
412

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Page 274 - They are led by an invisible hand to make nearly the same distribution of the necessaries of life which would have been made had the earth been divided into equal portions among all its inhabitants; and thus, without intending it, without knowing it, advance the interest of the society, and afford means to the multiplication of the species.
Page 229 - THE regard to those general rules of conduct is what is properly called a sense of duty, a principle of the greatest consequence in human life, and the only principle by which the bulk of mankind are capable of directing their actions.
Page 10 - And from thence arises one of the most important principles in human nature, the dread of death, the great poison to the happiness, but the great restraint upon the injustice of mankind, which, while it afflicts and mortifies the individual, guards and protects the society.
Page 270 - Power and riches appear then to be, what they are, enormous and operose machines contrived to produce a few trifling conveniencies to the body, consisting of springs the most nice and delicate, which must be kept in order with the most anxious attention, and which in spite of all our care are ready every moment to burst into pieces, and to...
Page 149 - In every part of the universe we observe means adjusted with the nicest artifice to the ends which they are intended to produce ; and in the mechanism of a plant, or animal body, admire how every thing is contrived for advancing the two great purposes of nature, the support of the individual; and the propagation of the species.
Page 248 - The sum of the ten commandments is, To love the Lord our God with all our heart, with all our soul, with all our strength, and with all our mind ; and our neighbour as ourselves.
Page 30 - ... the great, the awful, and respectable, the virtues of self-denial, of self-government, of that command of the passions which subjects all the movements of our nature to what our own dignity and honour, and the propriety of our own conduct, require, take their origin from the other.
Page 316 - Fortune never exerted more cruelly her empire over mankind, than when she subjected those nations of heroes to the refuse of the jails of Europe, to wretches who possess the virtues neither of the countries which they come from, nor of those which they go to, and whose levity, brutality, and baseness, expose them to the contempt of the vanquished.
Page 85 - The rich man glories in his riches, because he feels that they naturally draw upon him the attention of the world...
Page 2 - By the imagination we place ourselves in his situation, we conceive ourselves enduring all the same torments, we enter as it were into his body, and become in some measure the same person with him, and thence form some idea of his sensations, and even feel something which, though weaker in degree, is not altogether unlike them.

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