Comparative Politics: Interests, Identities, and Institutions in a Changing Global Order

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Jeffrey Kopstein, Mark Lichbach
Cambridge University Press, Aug 15, 2000 - Political Science - 448 pages
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Why are the countries of the world governed so differently? How did this diversity of political orders come about? Will liberal capitalism retain its appeal and spread further around the globe in the 21st century, or will new and hostile challengers come on the scene? These are the questions that guide this new introductory text to comparative politics. Cast through the lens of ten theoretically informed and historically grounded country studies, it illustrates and explains how the three major concepts of comparative political analysis - interests, identities, and institutions - shape the politics of nations. A novel feature of this textbook is its explicit discussion of the international challenges to each country's chosen path of development. These challenges frequently alter domestic interests and identities, and force countries to find new institutional solutions to the problems of modern politics. Written in a style free of heavy handed jargon and organized in a way that speaks to contemporary comparativists' concerns, this textbook provides students with the conceptual tools and historical background they need to understand the politics of today's complex world.

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About the author (2000)

Jeffrey Kopstein is assistant professor of political science at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Mark I. Lichbach is Professor of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland. He received a BA from Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, an MA from Brown University and a PhD in political science from Northwestern University. He is the author or editor of numerous books, including the award-winning The Rebel's Dilemma, and of numerous articles that have appeared in scholarly journals in political science, economics and sociology. His work has been supported by the National Science Foundation and private foundations. Lichbach has served as book review editor of the American Political Science Review, editor of the University of Michigan Press's series on interests, identities, and institutions, and as chair of three political science departments: the University of Maryland, the University of Colorado and the University of California, Riverside.

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