The Edinburgh history of the late rebellion, Volume 1

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1752
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Page 39 - I have, I confess, the greatest reason to adore the goodness of Almighty God, who has in so remarkable a manner protected me and my small army through the many dangers to which we were at first exposed, and who has led me in the way to victory, and to the capital of this ancient kingdom, amidst the acclamations of the King my father's subjects. Why then is so much pains taken to spirit up the minds of the people against this my undertaking ?
Page 40 - Why has the nation been so long crying out in vain for redress against the abuse of parliaments, upon account of their long duration, the multitude of placemen, which occasions their venality, the introduction of penal laws, and, in general, against the miserable situation of the kingdom at home and abroad ? All...
Page 49 - King, who is of fo ftricl an adherence to the Laws of our Country, that not an inftance can be pointed out, during his whole reign, wherein he made the leaft attempt upon the Liberty, or Property, or Religion, of a ftnglc perfon.
Page 55 - BEING come to recover the King our Father's just Rights, for which we are arrived with all his Authority, we are sorry to find that you should prepare to obstruct our Passage : We therefore, to avoid the Effusion of English Blood, hereby require you to open your Gates, and let us enter, as we desire, in a peaceable Manner ; which...
Page 38 - ... attempt is not undertaken in order to enslave a free people, but to redress and remove the encroachments made upon them ; not to impose upon any a religion which they dislike, but to secure them all...
Page 20 - Majesty's forces, they quit the said unjust and unwarrantable service, and return to their duty, since they cannot but be sensible, that no engagements entered into with a foreign usurper, can dispense •with the allegiance they owe to their natural sovereign. And, as a further encouragement to them to comply with their duty, and our commands, we promise to every such officer the same, or a higher post in our service, than that which at...
Page 38 - In consequence of the rectitude of our royal father's intentions, we must farther declare his sentiments with regard to the national debt. That it has been contracted under an unlawful government nobody can disown, no more than that it is now a most heavy load upon the nation ; yet, in regard that it is for the greatest part due to those very subjects whom he promises to protect, cherish, and defend, he is resolved to take the advice of his parliament concerning it...
Page 21 - And having thus sincerely, and in the presence of Almighty God, declared the true sentiments and intentions of the king our royal father, as well as our own in this expedition, we do hereby require and command all his loving subjects to...
Page 40 - Has a family, upon whom a faction unlawfully bestowed the diadem of a rightful Prince, retained a due sense of so great a trust and favour? Have you found more humanity and...
Page 19 - By virtue and authority of the above commission of regency, granted unto us by the King our royal father, we are now come to execute his Majesty's will and pleasure, by setting up his royal standard, and asserting his undoubted right to the throne of his ancestors. " We do, therefore, in his Majesty's name, and pursuant to the tenor of his several declarations, hereby grant a free, full, and general pardon, for all treasons, rebellions...

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