A Pedestrian Journey Through Russia and Siberian Tartary: To the Frontiers of China, the Frozen Sea, and Kamtchatka, Volume 2

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Constable and Company, 1829 - Siberia (Russia)
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Page 215 - SIR, — I am directed by the President of the Royal Society to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, and to inform you that the paper to which you allude, dated 10th January, 1821, and addressed to the Secretary and President of the Royal Society, has also been received, and will be returned to you, on your applying for the same, or to any person producing an order signed by you for that purpose. " I have the honour to be, &c.
Page 53 - Among the public buildings are to be reckoned magazines for bread, for powder, for sailors, for convicts, for wine, and for arms ; a guardhouse, smithy, hospital, chancery school, and a building for the chief and his assistant. All, however, with the exception of the hospital, sailors' barracks, and school, are, at best, like the rest of the city, but emblems of misery and wretchedness.
Page 130 - Romish church or chapel can boast. The Chinese temples, however, have this difference, — that real valuables are not to be seen; neither gold, silver, nor jewels, nor even the semblance of them, being placed about their images. I do not know whether this is the case in other parts of China. There is no fortress or defence to Maimatchin, though from three to five hundred souls remain in the village during the spring, summer, and autumn. Trade continues during the whole of the year; and there is...
Page 203 - ... relied upon; particularly, situated as he is, possessing hardly sufficient knowledge of the Russian language to appretiate duly the value of such hearsay information. His manuscript must become voluminous, and, of course, too bulky to be sent by private hands ; it can only therefore be forwarded by the post, where, without doubt, it will be subject to the examination of those whose duty it is to inspect documents of such a nature as this is likely to be, and will be treated according to its merit....
Page 149 - ... present, probably, there is less danger in traversing it than any other part of the Russian empire; though the inhabitants in general do not possess so much of that kindness for which the Siberians are celebrated, most of them being schismatics from the Greek church, and descendants of those sent thither for colonization by the Empress Catherine. Their villages are now so numerous and wellpeopled, that sixty and seventy dwellings are met with at every five or six miles. Having been hospitably...
Page 65 - The difficulties she encountered,! this and the subsequent journeys, were such as would have shaken the most robust, and bore very hard upon her delicate frame ; yet it is but justice and truth to say, that in no part of our journey did she express a murmur ; on the contrary, the more real or apparent the difficulties to contend with, the more willing and reconciled I found her to brave them. From Bulgeine we made ten miles, halting on the banks of the Okota.
Page 101 - Buriats is of too old a date, and they are of too obstinate a disposition, to receive any change. Nor is it much to be wondered at : their own religious books point out the course they pursue ; and when the religion of a people, who have been, from time immemorial, acquainted with the art of reading and writing, is attacked, and attempted to be changed, by three strangers, it is almost preposterous to expect any favourable result. For my own part, so small are my hopes of their success, that I do...
Page 97 - Selenga runs, we coasted it for thirty miles before we arrived at the place of crossing. The ice was so clear, transparent, and slippery, that I could not keep my feet, yet the horses are so accustomed to it, that hardly an instance occurs of their falling. We crossed the lake, and reached the opposite village, which has a considerable monastery, in time to breakfast; we had been two hours and a half in going the distance, forty miles. Such is, however, the rapidity with which three horses a-breast...
Page 130 - Romish character about it* I saw no images of female saints, but numbers of gigantic men and horses, and the whole was evidently the same sort of glittering, carved. and gilded work, as the most tawdry Romish church or chapel can boast. The Chinese temples, however, have this difference, that real valuables are not to be seen : neither gold, silver. nor jewels, nor even the semblance of them being placed about their images. I do not know! whether this is the case in other parts of China. There is...
Page 22 - ... entered his more humble dwelling. The Toion was much surprised, and more vexed at this slight, which tended to lower him in the opinion of his subjects. The fact proved to be that the Toion is really one of the oldest Kamtchatdales, and was only complying with the custom of the ancient inhabitants of his country, which is, not to invite a stranger into his dwelling, considering that such stranger has the right not only to take it, but to eject Its owners. I left him with great regret that I could...

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