I will bear witness, Volumes 1-2

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Modern Library, 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 519 pages
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The author's firsthand account of life in Nazi Germany chronicles the escalation of the war, including the bombing of Dresden and his escape from deportation to a Jewish concentration camp.
 

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Holocaust

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I have long been interested in learning the background of the holocaust particularly from the point of view of the survivors. This is yet another volume that provides information of that aspect and does it well. Read full review

I will bear witness: a diary of the Nazi years

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The second volume of Klemperer's Holocaust diary is even more compelling than the first (LJ 10/15/98). As one of 198 surviving Dresden Jews, Klemperer offers unique, keenly felt observations of daily ... Read full review

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Whither Zionism?
Ernst Rodin
No preview available - 2001
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About the author (2001)

A professor of Romance languages in Dresden, Victor Klemperer wrote several major works on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French literature before he was expelled from his post in 1935. He lived through the war in Dresden with his wife, Eva. Klemperer's secret diaries were thought for many years to have been lost or suppressed by the Communist authorities of East Germany, where Klemperer lived after the war. He wife deposited them after his death in 1960 in the Dresden Landesarchiv, where they remained until they were uncovered by Victor Nowojski, a former pupil, who edited and transcribed them for publication in Germany. Their reception there was a national event. The diaries have been translated into twelve languages.

About the Translator

Martin Chalmers has translated, from the German, books by Hubert Fichte, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, and Erich Fried. He is a frequent contributor to the New Statesman and The Independent, and lives in London.

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