Garden and Farm Topics

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Peter Henderson, 1884 - Agriculture - 244 pages
 

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Page 40 - When in this state, they may be placed in any obscure part of a stove or greenhouse where it is dry, and of a temperature not under forty or fifty degrees. If kept in such a situation during winter, some kinds may be turned out into a warm border in spring, where they will flower ; and if the season be fine, they will renew their bulbs in time to be taken up before the approach of frost. The chief value of these plants, however, is, to produce flowers in the winter season, which they readily do if...
Page 42 - ... kinds, which should be taken up and replanted every second or third year, as the new bulbs, which are formed every season, are always directly under the old bulb ; and thus in the course of a few years the bulbs descend so low as to be out of the reach of the air, and consequently incapable of vegetation. Thus it will be generally found that persons in the habit of growing Irises are always complaining of...
Page 189 - The lines being marked out, the seed is sown by hand or by seed-drill, at the rate of 8 to 12 pounds per acre. After sowing — and this rule applies to all seeds, if sown by hand — the seed must be trodden in by walking on the lines, so as to press the seed down into the drills. After treading in, the ground must be leveled by raking with a wooden or steel rake 'along the lines lengthways, not across. That done, it would be advantageous to use a roller over the land, so as to smooth the surface...
Page 192 - French as one of the plantes ameliorcmtes ; for in Southern France wheat has been successfully raised after six or seven years of alfalfa on ground, which formerly had failed to give good crops of wheat. Although alfalfa may be grown in cold latitudes as well as in warm, as the plant is entirely hardy, yet its value is not so marked in cold climates where it finds competitors in red clover and the grasses; but in light soils, anywhere, particularly in warm climates, its deeprooting properties make...
Page 23 - Plantalne, among which riseth vp a naked stalke, halfe a foot high, garnished with many white floures, like bels, with blunt and turned edges, of a strong savour, yet pleasant enoughf, which being past, there come small, red berries, much like the berries of asparagus, wherein the seed is contained.
Page 190 - The labor entailed in this method of sowing Alfalfa in drills is somewhat greater than when sown broadcast in the usual way of grasses and clover, but there is no question that it is by far the best and most profitable plan, for it must be remembered that the plant is a hardy perennial, and is good for a crop for eight to ten years. Moreover, the sowing in drills admits of the crop being easily fertilized, if it is found necessary to do so; as all that is necessary, is to sow bone dust, superphosphates,...
Page 15 - ... 2. The three inner petals should set close to the three outer ones, and the whole should be broad enough to allow of the fullest expansion without quartering (as it is called), that is, exhibiting any vacancy between the petals. 3. The petals should be thick, smooth, and stiff, and keep their form well. 4. The ground should be clear, and distinct, whether white or yellow.
Page 192 - ... the cost. At the date of our writing, thousands in Florida and other Southern States are engaged in the culture of oranges, and other fruits, and vegetables for the Northern markets — and while in specially favored locations success has attended these enterprises, yet it is doubtful if one in four makes it profitable; while, with the culture of this valuable forage plant, the vast sums paid for Northern hay would not only be saved, but the products of the dairy would assume an importance which...
Page 189 - That done, it would be advantageous to use a roller over the land, so as to smooth the surface and further firm the seed, but this is not indispensable. When seeds are drilled in by machine the wheel presses down the soil on the seed, so that treading in with the feet is not necessary. After the seeds germinate so as to show the rows, which will be in from two to four weeks, according to the weather, the ground must be hoed between, and this is best done by some light wheel-hoe, if by hand, such...

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