The Unstrung Harp, Or, Mr. Earbrass Writes a Novel

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Harcourt Brace & Company, 1953 - Fiction - 64 pages
61 Reviews
On November 18th of alternate years Mr Earbrass begins writing 'his new novel.' Weeks ago he chose its title at random from a list of them he keeps in a little green note-book. It being tea-time of the 17th, he is alarmed not to have thought of a plot to which The Unstrung Harp might apply, but his mind will keep reverting to the last biscuit on the plate." So begins what the Times Literary Supplement called "a small masterpiece." TUH is a look at the literary life and its "attendant woes: isolation, writer's block, professional jealousy, and plain boredom." But, as with all of Edward Gorey's books, TUH is also about life in general, with its anguish, turnips, conjunctions, illness, defeat, string, parties, no parties, urns, desuetude, disaffection, claws, loss, trebizond, napkins, shame, stones, distance, fever, antipodes, mush, glaciers, incoherence, labels, miasma, amputation, tides, deceit, mourning, elsewards. You get the point. Finally, TUH is about Edward Gorey the writer, about Edward Gorey writing The Unstrung Harp. It's a cracked mirror of a book, and it's dedicated to RDP or Real Dear Person.

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Review: The Unstrung Harp

User Review  - Laura Roberts - Goodreads

If you've never read anything by Edward Gorey, let me be the first to tell you that you've been wasting your life most miserably. Then, allow me to recommend the first Edward Gorey book you ought to ... Read full review

Review: The Unstrung Harp

User Review  - Goodreads

If you're a writer, you must read this. It will take you 20 minutes and you will choke on your own laughter. And die. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (1953)

Edward Gorey (1925-2000) wrote and illustrated such popular books as The Doubtful Guest, The Gashlycrumb Tinies, and The Headless Bust. He was also a very successful set and costume designer, earning a Tony Award for his Broadway production of Edward Gorey's Dracula. Animated sequences of his work have introduced the PBS series Mystery! since 1980.

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