The Retreat of Scientific Racism: Changing Concepts of Race in Britain and the United States Between the World Wars

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Cambridge University Press, 1992 - History - 381 pages
This fascinating study in the sociology of knowledge documents the refutation of scientific foundations for racism in Britain and the United States between the two World Wars, when racial differences were no longer attributed to cultural factors. Professor Barkan considers the social significance of this transformation, particularly its effect on race relations in the modern world. Discussing the work of the leading biologists and anthropologists who wrote between the wars, he argues that the impetus for the shift in ideologies came from the inclusion of outsiders (women, Jews, and leftists) who infused greater egalitarianism into scientific discourse. But even though the emerging view of race was constrained by a scientific language, he shows that modern theorists were as much influenced by social and political events as were their predecessors.
 

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The retreat of scientific racism: changing concepts of race in Britain and the United States between the world wars

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In this book Barkan details the changing views of race among scientists in Britain and the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. This period was especially chaotic as the fledgling science of ... Read full review

Contents

V
15
VI
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VII
25
VIII
38
IX
53
X
57
XI
66
XII
76
XXVII
210
XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
268

XIII
90
XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
162
XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
285
XXXVIII
296
XXXIX
310
XL
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XLI
325
XLII
328
XLIII
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XLIV
341
XLV
347
XLVI
372
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