Corn-law fallacies, with the answers. By the author of the Catechism on the corn laws

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1839
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Page 37 - There is one very unpleasing remark which every one who attends to the subject of prices will be induced to make, that the labouring classes, especially those engaged in agriculture, were better provided with the means of subsistence in the reign of Edward III or of Henry VI than they are at present. In the fourteenth century, Sir John Cullum observes, a harvest man had...
Page 6 - Majesty, by Order in Council, to permit the importation and exportation of goods in foreign vessels, on payment of the same duties as were chargeable when imported in British vessels, in favour of all such countries as should not levy discriminating duties upon goods imported into those countries in British vessels ; and further to levy upon the vessels of such countries, when frequenting British ports, the same tonnage duties as are chargeable on British vessels.
Page 37 - ... enabled him in a week to buy a comb of wheat ; but to buy a comb of wheat, a man must now (1784) work ten or twelve days. So...
Page 66 - ... stated to be the source of all power and enjoyment; and without which, in fact, there would be no cities, no military or naval force, no arts, no learning, none of the finer manufactures, none of the conveniences and luxuries of foreign countries, and none of that cultivated and polished society, which not only elevates and dignifies individuals, but which extends its beneficial influence through the whole mass of the people ? Section 2.
Page 38 - ... grain, would be exactly compensated by the contraction of the home market for five millions of quarters, previously in the course of annual production in the British islands. But, in truth, this is putting the argument a great deal too favourably for the anti-corn-law party ; for nothing can be clearer than that, by such a transfer of agriculture from the British islands to the shores of the Vistula, the possible, or perhaps probable, extension of the market for our manufactures, by the increased...
Page 40 - There is not," says Mr Alison, " the slightest foundation for the opinion which is sometimes entertained, even by well-informed persons, that such is the magnitude of our manufacturing population, that the supply of the country with foreign grain has been, or soon will become, a matter of necessity ; and that the evils which have been described, however great, are unavoidable. It appears from the table quoted below/ that there were in 1827...
Page 37 - Cullum observes a harvest man had fourpence a day, which enabled him in a week to buy a comb of wheat ; but to buy a comb of wheat a man must now...
Page 36 - Italian cultivation was destroyed as much as the African or Egyptian was increased; the price of grain underwent no diminution to the Roman populace, but was fully higher, on an average, than it has been in England for the last ten years, while the small arable farms of Italy, the nursery of the legions, were absorbed in...
Page 34 - Is it, then, really certain that an unrestricted importation of foreign grain would, in the long run, lower the money price of provisions to the British labourers...
Page 38 - British manufacturers. No one, indeed, can for an instant doubt that if our manufacturers could retain the home market for their produce at its present level, and at the same time obtain, by the free importation of foreign grain, a proportional extension of the foreign market for their produce in the great grain states of the Continent, they would be very great gainers indeed by the change. But would they be able to do this...

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