The State in Its Relation to Trade

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Page 209 - This series is intended to meet the demand for accessible information on the ordinary conditions, and the current terms, of our political life. The series will deal with the details of the machinery whereby our Constitution works, and the broad lines upon which it has been constructed. The following are the titles to the Volumes : — Central Government.
Page 204 - it is twice blessed ; It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes...
Page 100 - ... the inexpediency of concentrating in a dominant bureaucracy, all the skill and experience in the management of large interests, and all the power of organized action, existing in the community; a practice which keeps the citizens in a relation to the government like that of children to their guardians, and is a main cause of the inferior capacity for political life which has hitherto characterized the over-governed countries of the Continent, whether with or without the forms of representative...
Page 100 - ... the danger of unnecessarily swelling the direct power and indirect influence of government, and multiplying occasions of collision between its agents and private citizens ; and the still greater inexpediency of concentrating in a dominant bureaucracy, all the skill and experience in the management of large interests, and all the power of organized action, existing in the community...
Page 100 - The true reasons in favour of leaving to voluntary associations all such things as they are competent to perform, would exist in equal strength if it were certain that the work itself would be as well or better done by public officers.
Page 165 - The first step must be to rid our minds of the idea that there are any such things in social matters as abstract rights.
Page 71 - He adopts the old notion, that the ' money or coin of a country is the standard measure by which the value of all things bought and sold is regulated and ascertained ; and it is in itself, at the same time, the value or equivalent for which goods are exchanged, and in which contracts are generally made payable...
Page 102 - It is perhaps necessary to remark, that the state may be the proprietor of canals or railways without itself working them; and that they will almost always be better worked by means of a company, renting the railway or canal for a limited period from the state.
Page 101 - ... prevented from existing. I have already more than once adverted to the case of the gas and water companies, among which, though perfect freedom is allowed to competition, none really takes place, and practically they are found to be even more irresponsible, and unapproachable by individual complaints, than the government. There are the expenses without the advantages of plurality of agency; and the charge made for services which cannot be dispensed with, is, in substance, quite as much compulsory...
Page 115 - The principle of limitation of dividend is in itself faulty. So long as the charge is not too high, the public have no interest in the reduction of dividend. Their interest is in the reduction of price, which is a totally different thing. The fallacy lies in supposing that what is taken from the shareholders necessarily goes into the pocket of the consumer. It does no such thing; it is probably wasted in extravagances, which the company have no motive whatever in reducing.

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